You Can Get Diabetes By Touching Someone

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DBB FB Blog Catch Diabetes Touching

Our family moved in 2001. As a result of the move the kids transferred to a new school. Kurtis was living with diabetes for just under one year. In his previous school the acceptance & understanding of staff & children with his diabetes was great.

Within weeks of his new adventures of being a 3rd Grader in his new school, Kurtis informs me he can’t make friends. “Why?”, I ask. “They point at me and laugh. The kids are telling other kids if they touch me they will get diabetes.”

Within days I receive a phone call from his teacher. She asks if I will come in & speak with the class. She tells me the same story Kurtis has just days before. She wants the class to learn about diabetes.  She is concerned that the misinformation being discussed among his peers will lead to long-term issues.  She is concerned for Kurtis’ well being.   Ms. Maker explains she feels I will make an impact because I live with diabetes as well. They will see me as a Mom who is a nurse, I have friends & I have a daughter that doesn’t have diabetes. I agree & start planning how I will speak to the children about this.

The main myth to displace was reassuring them that Kurtis didn’t get his diabetes from touching me.   My plan was to think like a 7 & 8-year-old.

Word for word I can’t tell you what I said or how I said it.  It was a little less than 12 years ago.  I do remember sitting in a chair with the kids sitting on the floor around me.  They had a lot of questions.  I kept it simple.  Kurtis was pleased & so proud his Mom went in to talk with the kids about his diabetes.  It helped with them being more social with him.  He was not gawked at as much.  But making friends continued to be an issue until Grade 5.

Look for my Blog tomorrow on what happened that caused the children to respect Kurtis and his diabetes.

 

 

“The secret of …

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“The secret of your future is hidden in your daily routine.” – Mike Murdock

In today’s society we are encouraged to break out, be stimulated, think outside the box.  We are told the less routine we adhere to the more abundant our life will become.  Becoming comfortable is to lose the opportunity to become a better person, to grow and expand our mind and soul.

In many aspects, breaking routine is without doubt a great thing.  Spontaneity can break one out of the doldrums, keep the mind sharp and create excitement.  

With respect to living with diabetes, having routine is essential.  It is proven that testing your blood sugars, taking your medications and insulin injections at the same time each day will increase your chances of success.  

To take it further, creating a routine with regards to healthy eating, meal and snack times is also of great benefit.  By pairing your medication or insulin routine with your meals and snacks, you will notice an increase in well being…once you are settled into your routine, ironing out the wrinkles.  After all, we are very personal in our diabetes.  Although we live with the same diagnosis, we are all unique in how we adapt to certain routines.

One last commitment which needs to be incorporated as part of your daily diabetes routine is physical activity.  The benefits of physical activity are as great as adhering to a routine with your medication, insulin and eating.  

The Centre of Disease Control cites the following as benefits to physical activity: 

By creating and committing to a routine, I hope this will enable you to live life with Diabetes Beyond Borders.

 

Home Away from Home

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Home Away from Home

Everybody needs a holiday
Everybody needs a holiday
Everybody needs a holiday

Close your eyes
And hit the sack
While your asleep
I`ll watch your back
Grab a chair
Have a seat
I`ve got the wheel
Rest your feet

I`ll stand guard
And keep the wolves at bay
Watch the fire
While you dream away
Earned a rest
I know you worked all day
I know
And everybody needs a holiday

Take a break
Shake that frown
Re-assess
What`s going down
Spare a thought
While you sit
Reconsider
And admit

I`ll stand guard
And keep the wolves at bay
Watch the fire
While you dream away
Earned a rest
I know you worked all day
I know
And everybody needs a holiday….

(taken from the lyrics & song by B.a.d. Big Audio Dynamite – Everybody Needs A Holiday)

My home is everything I have dreamed of since I can remember. My home has the characteristics of another era, a history that is rich. We have considerately and lovingly decorated it to portray the past but accommodate for the present. Colours on the walls are thoughtfully placed and abundant.

Friends and family come into our home and comment how warm and cozy it is. They express that they become so relaxed once they sit down they don’t want to leave.

With the comforts and reprieve of our home are also the stresses of outside forces attempting to penetrate the walls of where we find peace. With social media now at our finger tips and its essential use to promote career, the loosening of boundaries as far as working from home and the blurred lines of when work begins or ends, taking a holiday is essential for health and well-being.

Blessings abound when it comes to vacation options. We have a dear friend who has a home 45 minutes from ours. The picture posted is a brief glimpse of his beautiful abode. This earthy, eclectic, rustic home sits on 200 acres with trails, pond, cabin and a lake. We are so blessed as we are welcome anytime.

This weekend we decided to go on a holiday. With food, drink, dog and warm clothes packed, we headed to our home away from home. We ate, drank, walked, snowmobile, gathered wood, took pictures, shared stories, ideas, laughs and learnings. We go there and we feel like we are worlds away. The stress melts.

We are returning this week for a few days. The sap will be flowing from the maple trees and its time to make syrup.

Although it was so good to walk in the front door of our home and take it all in, I look forward to staying at our home away from home again.

Reaching Target and Realizations

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Reaching Target and Realizations

Further to my post yesterday, I met with my Diabetes Specialist today.

Albeit, I was still a little nervous. Not as much as yesterday. My “Too Funny” (see yesterdays Blog) moment helped alleviate the intensity. As I am sure you have experienced, the unknown can cause the mind to create various role plays. “If the Doctor asks this, I will say this.” “If he reacts this way to my answer, I will respond this way.”

After my “Too Funny” moment I asked myself, why am I aggressively role playing my visits?

The answers I came up with:

1. About 2 years ago I was asked by my Endocrinologist to take meds to lower my lipids & prophylactic kidney protecting meds. I reluctantly agreed although I did not see the reason. My ratio is incredible. My HDL is amazing. My kidneys are perfect. I decided about 8 months ago to stop my meds. I decided this based on 2 reasons:

First, my LDL (bad lipids) were still creeping up. Why should I keep taking a pill that was not doing it’s job?

Second, I met with my hormone specialist that deals with the bio identical hormones that I take. He convinced me that I didn’t need my lipid lowering agent. In his assessment of the medications that I took, he indicated that the lipid lowering agents would cause an increase in my bad lipids as opposed to decreasing them as they should have. He claims it was a plot by the pharmaceutical companies to amplify the symptoms so the pharmaceutical companies could sell more of the treatment. He claimed there was a better therapy that was natural & clinically worthy of taking…Astaxathanin.

I am all for ‘natural’ remedies, i.e.: therapy via food, herbs & vitamins. I believe in taking natures remedies before I will pop a pill made by the ‘powers that be’. I visit my local health food store frequently. I decided to become a one person clinical study. There is obviously no clinical significance but worthy of trying to see if it provided benefit to me. The last visit with my Endo 6 months ago showed it was going down, so I fibbed when he asked if I was compliant with my meds. I told him I was taking them off & on. I felt SO guilty! I wasn’t taking them at all but I respected him so much, I didn’t want to disappoint him. By habit, I am not a liar. As far as my diabetes goes, I am very concerned with the long term results and want to take the best course of action. With that being said, what were the implications of taking something that, up to this point, I had not seen any improvements but had a risk of side effects versus taking something that has no side effects but clinically provided signs of improvement.

2. I have always been guilty of too many low blood sugars. If I was to pick a high or low, I would pick a low. Not because it felt better, in no way did it feel better. I mean, come on, does a high or low blood sugar feel better or worse? They’re just different. I preferred them because I knew I didn’t risk complications. Frequent low blood sugars happen because I am so keen on running my sugars tight to target that I have increased the risk of lows. Also, until the past few years, I have been extremely active which have produced a lot of extra lows. I have noticed that as I get older, having low sugars is becoming very taxing. In the past 2 years my Diabetes Specialist has reinforced to me how hard these low sugars are on me (I’m feeling it!) & if they are in collaboration with a low A1C, they are not optimal. Also, I am alone throughout the night quite often. He reassured me it’s okay to run a little higher (above 6.2 – 6.4%) without the lows if it meant giving up the lows with the near normal tight control I was trying to achieve to feel good & stay safe through the night. Lows are not on purpose. They are caused because of being busy, being too active, taking too much insulin or not paying attention. In the past few years due to a lot of changes and stress in my life, I have been guilty of not paying as much attention to the fine details of my diabetes to achieve this goal.

3. In the past, a prominent Toronto Diabetes Specialist told me that due to the fact I have lived so long without complications with diabetes, I would never have any complications even if I ran higher than guidelines. I was told that my ‘success’ was purely genetic. I was excited by this but I didn’t decide to ‘screw it’ or decide that I was invincible. I’m still so afraid of complications. 38 years in, what guarantees do I have? I get nervous because I’m afraid one day he will assess my blood work, urinalysis, blood pressure or one of a number of tests and tell me I have a complication regardless of my choice for tight control.

The results of todays visit:

1. I am back on my lipid lowering agent based as my LDL has continued to increase. My one person clinical study failed.

2. I am a 10+ on a scale out of 10 on measuring stress. This will be for a few months more yet. The goal is to try to deal with it as best I can so I can manage my diabetes effectively. Cortisol & stress are a detriment to my well being with my general being, paired with living well with a chronic disease.

3. When I can afford it, I will wear a continuous glucose sensor to keep my blood sugars in check.

4. I will have fasting blood work done in 3 months to measure if the lipid lowering agents are working to decrease the LDL.

5. I will have random blood work done in 6 months & see my Endo again to see how my A1C is.

Today my A1C is 6.6. I am happy with today.