Once a Mom Always a Mom

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Once a Mom Always a Mom

What drives a Mom of a teen & young adult crazy? That our child living with Type 1 thinks they are invincible. With or without Type 1 most teens & young adults do. My biggest worry as a Mom of a 20-year-old son living with Type 1, who is very, very active working as an apprentice in the construction industry with his Step Dad & driving on his own, is being low on the job site or while driving. He usually remembers his insulin pen but sometimes forgets pen tips.

Pictured is what I pack for him to help him keep with managing his diabetes daily as well as ease some of my worry. One kit is for his car, one kit is for working on the job site. He is on multiple daily injections so after treating a low blood sugar with juice & reaching a blood sugar of 4.0 mmol/L he needs a carb/protein snack to prevent him from going low again.

I bought a 6 quart/5.83L Rubbermaid plastic container with lid for $2.00. I can fit 10 Minute Maid orange juice boxes which contain 23 grams of carbs, 6 Nature Valley chewy protein bars which has 17 grams of carbs,11 grams of protein & 1 box of 100 NovoFine 6mm pen tips. The only items I am missing are a Frio® pack http://www.readycareco.com/splashpage_frio.htm & 1 Novolin Pen Echo®.

We never stop being Mom’s or Dad’s but we assume once they enter into their 20’s they have enough figured out to survive & thrive BUT they don’t. They aren’t going to tell you that. Our job parenting a Type 1 teen & young adult is to slowly let them go while gently supporting them when they need it. This kit is one way I can support my son Kurtis without looking like I’m in his face about his diabetes. He will never tell me this but I believe it gives him a sense of security knowing he has the kit when he needs it & that he is supported by his Mom & Step Dad.

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Loss of Control – How Do We Regain It

I urge you to read the link I have attached.  Although it is from the Canadian Diabetes Association, I have read many links which involve Diabetes Associations that exist around the globe.  It seems on paper the protocol is in place if the school board or district is agreeable to implement & support.  Every parent past & present that has a child with Type 1 fight to keep their child safe at school.  The fact that our children are not viewed as ‘in need’ of special care in their daily management of diabetes at school is preposterous.  Every diabetes organization is posting guidelines & lobbying for change but it is happening too slow.  While school boards fight to keep their budgets or manage with less, our children living with diabetes’ risks of adverse events occurring is higher.

Examples to support the lack of guidelines & the situations Kurtis met as a result:

1.  In Grade 5 his class is in a portable.  Soon after the school year starts, Kurtis comes home to tell me during class that day he feels like he is having a low blood sugar.  He tells his teacher.  He tests & confirms.  The teacher sends him by himself out from the portable into the school to the office to get a juice box.  He tells me he is scared.  Two issues:  there are juice boxes in the classroom AND most important, she sends my scared son BY HIMSELF outside to enter the school & walk up a long hall & a set of stairs to treat himself for a low blood sugar.  What if he didn’t make it?

2.  In this same class, it is the middle of winter.  A similar event occurs.

3.  I discuss with the teacher the concern.  She explains she can not expect a student to go with him as they need to be in the class to learn.  She offers she can not leave the class to go with him & leave them on their own.

4.  I discuss my concerns with the principal.  She meets with the teacher & enforces a student needs to go with Kurtis when going to the office for a low…IF….there are NO juice boxes in the classroom.

5.  At one point, Kurtis has a severe low at school.  I meet with the principal & discuss options of having Glucagon for treatment if he becomes unable to take treatment orally.  She informs me the school board will not allow her or the staff to inject Glucagon.  I ask if children that have severe anaphylaxis to bee’s & peanuts have Epi-Pen’s at school?  She says “yes”.  I ask if the staff are allowed to inject the Epi-Pen if such an event occurs. She says “yes”.  I point out to her that both events need life saving injection of a drug.  She counters that she can call an ambulance with Kurtis & by the time they get to the school he will be okay.  I was furious.  How do you educate someone who is such an imbecile?  So stuck on the rules that they won’t consider a child’s life could be at jeopardy?

How did I deal with this?  I made myself on-call regardless whether I was sleeping from a night shift.  If I was working a 12-hour day, I was fortunate my parents were on stand-by.  I made it clear that the school was not to call 911 first (as the school was in the country), they call me.  I knew I could make it to the school quicker than the ambulance could.

Thankfully, with regards to his diabetes, nothing serious happened.

I am not sure how to make an impact to sway school boards to start a standardized protocol that allows for a budget for help in overseeing glucose testing, injecting & bolus of insulin, eating the correct food & bringing attention to the proper person the needs of a child with Type 1.  I do suggest lobbying & pressure by our local diabetes associations as well as supporting them in their campaign is instrumental.  Many voices are louder than one.  I urge you to take part.

A Parent’s Love

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A Parent's Love

It’s so hard to be a parent of a ‘child’ with diabetes. Kurtis has lived with Type 1 for 12 years.

My 19 year old ‘baby’ had his eyes examined & the results were not good. Two eye exams ago he showed signs of a small hemorrhage at the very back of his eye. It healed. We explained to him why (he knew) and what to do to change it (he knew). This time, as a result of poor control (he doesn’t test & does not see his diabetes team which is typical for this age), he has 2 new hemorrhages in the back of his other eye. The damage is correctible IF he improves his control. Definitely a bright light in the long dark tunnel it feels it is becoming.

To keep calm & be the bridge he needs to cross over to the next journey he needs to take is so hard, but as a parent we know it is a necessity.

I always want to view the glass as half full. With that being said, Kurtis asked about laser eye surgery for correction of his vision (by birth he only has 20% vision in one eye, he vision is very poor). Both myself & our Optometrist piped up that he needed to get his diabetes under control & correct the damage done before that was even a consideration. It seems that is his ‘carrot’ that dangles in front him for motivation. We did not lecture, we just briefly stated facts.

I asked him if he’d like me to book a diabetes clinic appointment and he declined. It’s hard but I have to let him figure it out on his own for now. Balance as a parent is so hard at this stage of the game. So hard. But necessary. If I smother him with harassing comments & overbearing actions he will continue to rebel. I need to let him sort it out and support him when he is ready. And pray…a lot.

“Are U Happy Having Diabetes?” – Facebook fan on Diabetes Beyond Borders page

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I was asked today by a Diabetes Beyond Borders Facebook fan if I was happy having diabetes. He then commented later he hated it.

The word ‘happy’ would not be the word to describe how I feel about living with diabetes.

How I see it is, I don’t have a choice with what I’ve been given.

I do see I am fortunate to have been diagnosed at age 5…I don’t recall not living with it. That makes it much easier to accept.

I could ‘hate’ it given my 19 year old son lives with it as well for the past 12 years. I could be bitter & angry but what purpose does that serve me & those that are in my life?

I have been given a gift to educate, motivate & write about my life with diabetes. It helps me deal with the feelings I have sometimes of being tired and overwhelmed with the constant demands of the disease. It makes me happy and I absolutely love that I can take my diabetes, the education and experiences I have to help, support and learn from others living with it too.

Throughout my childhood and teen years, my Mom taught me that I can let diabetes control me or I can control it.

I choose the latter.