Change or Transition?

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Change or Transition?

The words spill across the physicians desk or the hospital bed “You have diabetes.” or harder yet “Your child has diabetes.” Your head spins trying to absorb what that means. Depending on what your knowledge or experiences are, thoughts, emotions and response after this moment can vary dramatically. What you do know is that from that moment on your life has changed forever. Forever. Changed. Where do you go from here?

At this point I challenge you to substitute the word change for transition. Change is defined as an act or process through which something becomes different. Yes, this is true when receiving the diagnosis of diabetes. Something has become different. Transition is defined as the process or a period of changing from one state or condition to another. Do you see the difference between change and transition?

The picture you see is of the Peterborough Liftlock. It was recently taken on a beautiful Fall day on one of our weekend walks. Wikipedia provides a great summary of the greatness of this world renown landmark.

“The Peterborough Lift Lock is a boat lift located on the Trent Canal in the city of Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, and is Lock 21 on the Trent-Severn Waterway.
The dual lifts are the highest hydraulic boat lifts in the world, with a lift of 19.8 m (65 ft). This was a considerable accomplishment at the time when conventional locks usually only had a 2 m (7 ft) rise. It is not the highest boat lift of any type in the world today: the lift at Strépy-Thieu in Belgium has a greater capacity (1,350 tonnes) and height difference (73.15 m)…Many local residents of Peterborough skate on the canal below the lift lock in the winter.
The Peterborough Lift Lock was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1979,[1][2] and was named an Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1987.[3]”

Picture yourself sitting in a boat on the canal at the top of this lock. You will have to trust me at this point but the view from the top is amazing. Add the transition of colour on the leaves on the trees. It is breathtaking. I say the leaves are transitioning because we know that eventually those leaves will fall off and the tree will become bare. The tree is on a journey with an evolving objective. At this point it’s goal is to shed its existing facade so it can rest for the winter to produce buds and beautiful bright green leaves in the Spring.

Back to the locks…It is understood when you approach the lock that eventually you will transition to the water below and your journey will continue on. Whether you have a plan as to where you to go from that point can amplify the quality of the experience when you arrive at the bottom of the lock. Most would agree that a plan needs to be made in order for the next phase of the journey to be enjoyable and memorable. Without a plan to transition to the next location, all could be lost stressing out on what to do next rather then taking pleasure in the journey.

To be successful living with diabetes one must not be satisfied with just accepting change but beginning the transition to living a life in a different state. There are many steps to achieving this, a plan is essential. If these steps are taken and transition is accepted, not just the understanding and acceptance of change, you can live a full and productive life with diabetes. I encourage you to always plan and be secure in your journey knowing you are transitioning to the next destination in your life with diabetes.