Chili Con Carne

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Chili Con Carne

It’s getting to be that time of the year! Coming home from work or inside after a day outside in the cold to the smell of comfort food. What says comfort food better then Chili? A healthy, wholesome meal in one pot. Here is the tried & true recipe I’ve used for the past 10 years. Lot’s of flavour & spices! I double the recipe & freeze in meal size containers. Always tastier after it’s been reheated. Enjoy!

Ingredients:

1 1/3 lb ground meat (chicken, turkey or beef)
1 large onion, chopped
1 large green pepper, chopped
4 stalks celery, chopped
3-4 cloves garlic, finely chopped
28 oz (796 mL) canned pureed tomatoes
14 oz (398 mL) brown beans in tomato sauce
14 oz (398 mL) tomato sauce
2 (19 oz) red kidney beans, drained
1 (19 oz) romano beans, drained
1 tsp dried oregano
1 1/2 tbsp chili powder
1 1/4 tsp cumin
1 tsp salt
1/4 tsp black pepper
1/8 tsp cayenne
1/8 tsp ground thyme
pinch white pepper
1 tsp Louisiana style hot red pepper sauce
1/2 pkg taco seasoning (I use “Simply Organic” as it doesn’t contain MSG)
Olive oil, as much as necessary

Directions:

In a large heavy pot, brown ground beef in a little oil.
Add onions, celery, green pepper.
Saute over medium heat for 5-10 minutes.
When vegetables are cooked, but a little crisp, stir in tomatoes, brown beans, tomato sauce, red kidney beans, romano beans & mix well.
Add garlic & all other spices & mix well.
Cook on low for at least 1 1/2 hours.

Serves 6-8.

If too ‘hot’ add up to 1 tbsp brown sugar.

Meat Sauce

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Meat Sauce

Here is my favourite recipe for spaghetti sauce. I substitute pasta noodles for spaghetti squash for my plate. The rest of the gang prefers pasta noodles. I always double this & freeze, it makes a lot!!

Ingredients:

2-3 tbsp olive oil
2 onions, chopped
1 head garlic, minced
2 lbs of ground meat (chicken, turkey, beef)
1 tbsp + 1/2 tsp salt
2 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 tsp paprika
2 (28oz) cans tomato sauce
2 (28oz) cans tomato puree
2 tbsp dried basil
2 bay leaves, cracked
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
6 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 cup of red wine

Directions:

Heat a large stockpot on medium heat.
Add the olive oil & onions. Saute until the onions are translucent, about 7-10 minutes.
Add the garlic & saute 1-2 minutes longer.
Add the ground beef & sauté until brown.
Season the meat with about 1/2 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp pepper & the paprika.
Add all 5 cans of tomatoes.
Add 1 tbsp salt, 2 tsp pepper, the basil, bay leaves, cayenne, parsley, oregano & red wine.
Stir until all ingredients until well combined.
Bring to a low boil then lower heat & simmer 1-4 hours. The sauce will be ready in 1 hour but tastes better the longer you simmer it.

Makes about 4 quarts.

Healing

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Healing

I like to keep my body parts. I figure each one is there for a reason. But, when all other options have been exercised & surgery is the only option….well, reluctantly, I know when it’s time to fold ’em.

I am not new to surgery. I have had 4 surgeries between the ages of 21 – 32. I’m proud to say, I’ve had success with all surgeries & recoveries. It’s a challenge to walk away healthy without infection or complications, especially when living with diabetes.

It’s been 10 years since my last surgery. It’s been almost 20 years since my last major surgery.

When I found out a few months ago I would be under the knife once again, having major surgery with a 6 week recovery time, I decided to be proactive in preparing so my recovery would be uneventful.

I am only 4 days post op so I may be putting the cart before the horse with this surgery but I want to post some considerations about how to prepare before, during & after.

Before Surgery:

1. Gather a reliable support team that can be there for you before, during & after surgery. Make sure your team knows their responsibilities throughout this process. If someone offers to help, this is one time you can’t afford to say no. Don’t try to be a hero. I never heard anyone talking about the time “so and so had surgery & what a champ he or she was going solo, doing it all on their own.”

2. Don’t go crazy cooking, baking & cleaning. What?!? you say? Shouldn’t I have stuff in the freezer & the house spotless for when I come home to recover? Sure, if you were healthy before surgery to do that, it would be ideal. But consider, why are you having surgery? Your body is not running at full capacity. By stressing yourself out making, baking & cleaning you are depleting your immune system to a point that you may set yourself up for illness before surgery (then, it may be cancelled) or cause infection post-surgery. Although it may be tough, go to the local health food store & buy organic, pre-made meals that one of your team mates can heat up. Same with the kids lunches. I’m not meaning pre-packaged boxed/canned garbage…there are a variety of ‘homemade’ soups, sauces & meals available today that have only a few ingredients & are good for you. Just make sure to watch the sodium content…you don’t want to get all puffy & bloated.

3. Which leads me to my next point….eat clean, well-balanced nutritional meals & snacks leading up to surgery. I mean, we all should all the time but if you have lost focus, now is the time to get back on track. If you don’t have a Juicer, I urge you to buy one. Use it often. Eat a variety of fresh, organic vegetables & fruits. Keep your protein lean. Keep your carbs complex & low GI. If you nourish your body properly, it will be ready to perform at a high level of healing during & after surgery.

4. Test blood sugars more often. Keep them within target. Consult with your Diabetes Team to make sure you are running at optimal capacity for diabetes management. High sugars can cause infection and/or slow healing.

5. Be honest during your Pre-Op visit at the hospital about which meds you are taking. I mean, prescription, herbal & homeopathic remedies as well as essential fatty acids. I take herbal & homeopathic tinctures as well as EFA which I had to stop 2 weeks before surgery as they increased my risk for bleeding.

6. If you are physically active until this point, if the Specialist agrees it is okay, keep doing what you do or alter it to accommodate to your circumstance. I was not able to be as active as I used to be but I made sure to walk 5 – 10 km each day to keep my heart, lungs, mind & muscles working.

7. Get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep a night.

8. Drink a lot of water. More than 8-8oz glasses a day.

The Night Before Surgery:

1.  Pack a cooler bag of simple, instant food that is healthy & wholesome for your hospital visit. Below is what I packed in mine:

– Nature’s Path Organic Instant Oatmeal Plus Flax
– (2) glass jars of Green’s Juice I made with my Juicer
– (2) 1/4 cup containers of hemp seed to add to my oatmeal
– (2) containers of 2 tbsp of Skinny B Breakfast Cereal
– (2) containers of 2 tbsp of Holy Crap Breakfast Cereal
– (2) single servings of plain Greek Yogurt

The Day of Surgery:

1. Ask your surgery to be booked first thing in the morning. You will be asked to have nothing to eat or drink the night before. Some of your diabetes meds may be held. But, with the risk of fasting comes the risk of a low sugar. Being booked in the morning gives you the opportunity to have an IV put in place so that if you have a low blood sugar the staff can give you sugar through it.

2. Remember to breathe deeply, often. Stay calm. Getting anxious over the unknown & probably what won’t happen will raise your blood pressure, heart rate & blood sugar. All the hormones released that cause this will not help with the healing.

3. When you feel yourself getting anxious, visualize what you would love to do 6 weeks from now. Imagine yourself having a successful operation & healing process. Envision how much better you will feel afterwards.

3. Ask questions. Although they may seem dumb to you, they really aren’t.

4. Educate the team in the hospital about your diabetes. They don’t know as much as you do. They can’t! They don’t live with it.

5. Be your own advocate. If something doesn’t seem right, speak up.

The Hospital Stay:

1. Be aware of what’s on your food tray. For the 2 days I stayed, I was presented every processed juice & flavour of jello imaginable. Was that going to help my healing? Nope. It would just spike my sugars. I resorted to my cooler of food I brought. My Greens Juices got me through the first 24 hours. The oatmeal, hemp, yogurt & Skinny B got me through the rest of my stay. The nurses admired that I advocated for myself by bringing the cooler of food.

2. Take the pain meds. Again, don’t be a hero. No pain, no gain does not work. Pain releases hormones that will cause your sugars to go up….and your blood pressure and your heart rate…get it? 🙂 You will not get addicted.

3. Sleep and move. Sleep as much as you can. As soon as the nurse says it’s time to get out of bed, whether you just stand up or take a few steps, it is important to move. It gets the blood flowing which helps your surgical incision heal.

4. Test, test, test. The hospital staff will do that for you a lot too, but I bring my own meter as back up as well. It may not be calibrated to the hospital lab but at least I can report to them if it’s not time for them to test & I know something is off with my sugar. I also wear a Continuous Glucose Meter paired with my pump.

5. Be aware that the grogginess from pain meds can mask a low blood sugar.

6. Be aware of your body. Listen to it. Trust your gut. You know you best!

7. Drink lots of water! LOTS!!

Recovering At Home:

1. Abide by what the instruction sheet & the nursing staff have said. Don’t push yourself. You will not push yourself closer to recovery but closer to a risk of infection & slow it down.

2. Sleep a minimum of 8 hours a night, if your body says to go to bed at 8pm, do it.

3. Nap when you’re tired.

4. Be as mobile as your Doctor has permitted you to be.

5. Inspect your incision(s) daily. If they start to look red, inflamed or have discharge, you need to call your Doctor right away.

6. Test, test, test. Keep your sugars within target. I’ll repeat this again….high sugars will slow the healing process & promote infection.

7. Eat clean, eat well. Keep up with the Greens Juice. Eat lots of vegetables & fruits. Eat lean protein. Keep to low GI, complex carbs.

8. Call on your Team. Refer to #1 “Before Surgery”.

9. Drink lots of water. LOTS!!

These are general guidelines. Your circumstances may be unique & there may be some suggestions I have made that the Doctor has advised against or differently. Please listen to your Doctor. He & you, know your circumstance best.

Cravings

Want tips & tricks on eating well & losing weight? Here is Eden’s next Blog about her Journey. Eden is a busy woman!! She lives with Type 1, at the end of her years in University, about to graduate in May and working hard to lose weight & exercise so she is looking good for her height for graduation.

Help me support Eden in her goals as she moves closer to her goals!! Cheers, Tracy

“Hey Everyone!
Sorry my blogs have been so spaced out! Last week of classes so my blogs will be every other day lol Lots going on! So I thought I would share some of my favorite snacks that I tend to have during the evening. Sometimes in the evening is when I feel like eating the contents of my fridge ha ha! Before I started caring about my weight, I would typically not think twice about eating chips, cookies, 2 granola bars (sometimes more) and god knows what else! So it is hard to not want to eat at night, and I know if I don’t I will be hungry and probably have low blood sugars. So these are some of the things I now LOVE
1. One thing I always have is a drink of water, and a HUGE chai tea with one Truvia (or 2 splenda) and my almond milk. Almond milk takes a month or so to really get used to in beverages, but there is NO SUGAR and VERY LOW FAT! I LOVE IT!
2. Another thing I love having is almonds. I usually buy Blue Diamond Lime and Chili almonds, these are salted, but I only allow myself 11 at night if I choose this. If I choose this, I usually have 1 cup (usually 6) strawberries or a small apple with cinnamon baked for 1 minute in the microwave.
3. My Cheat Night Snacks: Ok so everyone has these, and if you were to tell me I would never have another chip or cookie again, I would die! So I figured out different ways to have things I love, but that are healthier for me. So tonight (for example) I had Special K cracker chips (they have sour cream and BBQ flavors) 18 cracker/chips are 80 calories, 1.5 grams of fat and 14 carbs! Compared to regular chips which are ten times the amount of fat and calories!
For cookies, I make my own which take 20 minutes MAX! I usually put in a bowl 1 cup of oatmeal, ½ cup of egg whites, 1 or 2 splenda, and I use half a scoop of chocolate protein powder (I think cocoa would be fine) I mix it all up and bake them in the oven for 10 minutes at 400 (depending on your oven, keep an eye on them!) I also like adding some natural peanut butter on top for some extra flavor. If you mix it up, and it seems dry add some more egg whites and some water 
Hopefully you like some of my ideas! I always have a chai tea because of its health benefits and it makes you feel full ”

Covering Up

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Covering Up

Another great update from Eden!! Eden’s diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes came at the age of 17. After gaining a lot of weight & feeling she did not have the support from the health care profession she needed to empower herself. Eden set out on her own to learn & discover how to live life with diabetes beyond borders. Eden has a very busy life, finishing her degree at University as well as setting goals to manage her diabetes & lose weight in a healthy way before her graduation in May.

Support Eden as she moves forward daily in her journey to empower herself living with diabetes & successfully meet a weight that is healthy for her body. What she is achieving since being diagnosed 4 years ago is nothing short of amazing!

“Hey Everyone!
So yesterday was a big day for me, I wore a sports tank top while exercising! This may sound ridiculous, but I have never showed off my arms working out…EVER! The one and only time I did not have anything covering them at all was at my prom, and if you read my previous post…not my favorite time since I gained 30 pounds! At first I felt self-conscious, but then I thought no one is even paying attention to me. It was fantastic not wearing a hoodie while doing extreme cardio!!! OMG I didn’t get as sweaty and overheated….AMAZING haha. I felt confident that I could finally (in my mind) pull off this look! I will post a picture tomorrow.
Luckily I have one more week of classes left, and then I can start hitting the gym for longer periods of time, and really focusing on my weight loss! I would like to be at the gym for 1.5 hours a day instead of 1 hour. I am so excited to get this semester over with, since I have 6 university courses, gym, part-time work and balancing my time between 3 houses (my home, my boyfriends, and grandmas). I refuse to give up and I would like to be at least 158-160 before I walk on that stage to graduate. I am getting a dress in 4 weeks when I go to Toronto, and buying it smaller so it fits me perfectly on the big day” :)

For most diagno…

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For most diagnoses all that is needed is an ounce of knowledge, an ounce of intelligence, and a pound of thoroughness. – Anonymous

In January, for the second time in two months I arrive in the Emergency Department.  

I have to be in pretty rough shape to go there.  I can count on one hand how often I have gone for myself.  Having worked in the ER, I have seen people’s definition of what an emergency is.   I don’t want to be one of those people.  But, here I am doubled over in pain again.  Just before heading out the door, I stand with my hands shaking, heart pounding, crying…Googling my symptoms one more time, trying to find a diagnosis that I can fix so I don’t have to go.  Then I think to myself…what if I am dying of something and they can treat it?  That would be really stupid!

So off I go.  The Triage Nurse asks what’s happening.  I tell her.  She takes my history.  Takes my blood pressure.  WHOA!!  I guess I am in pain….155/100.  Ok, I feel a little more justified in being there.  They take me right in.  Ok, I’m feeling even more justified.  

The ER Doctor comes into assess me and has already looked up my health history from the past 10 years! That’s a first!!  I describe to him what I have and am presently experiencing.  I tell him my thoughts about it.  I tell him the tests I have had.  He urgently orders a shot of pain medication in my hip.  The nurse comes in and tells me that it will sting a bit as it is going in.  As she injects it, I comment to her that it doesn’t really hurt.  THEN, she pulls the needle out and man, oh, man…talk about a delayed reaction!!  The burn!  But, if it was going to take the pain away, the burn was the least of my discomfort.

The thorough assessment by the Doc gave me some reassurance that this time there would be a diagnosis.  Although I had an Ultrasound and a CT Scan from my earlier ER visit, which showed nothing, the Dr insists I should have another CT Scan.  In my mind, I am thinking MRI! MRI!  But I figure I will humour him.  

Finally the pain med begins to take the edge off.  During the Ultrasound, the Tech is taking the probe across one spot in particular, over and over.  Let me tell you, that was fun…NOT!  A necessary evil.  Finally, she asks if I have a had a different type of Ultrasound.  I have not and feel a sense of relief that she is deciding to do this.  Afterwards, she informs me the ER Dr will talk with us about the results when we go back to Emerg.  She sends us on our way.

Back in the ER, it takes the Dr a bit of time before he comes to speak with us.  I am terrified. Is it, he still doesn’t know or something very serious?

He tells us he has spoken with a Specialist and tells me I have a condition called Adenomyosis.  OK!  I have an answer.  I have a condition.  BUT, what is it, I ask.  He says he doesn’t know, he has never heard of it.  Huh?!?  So is it treatable?  Is it something I have to live with the rest of my life, because pain and diabetes management don’t go well together.  Is it terminal?  He tells us the Specialist wants to see me in a week to discuss treatment options.  In the meantime, he sends me home on Tylenol #3’s and prescription NSAID’s.

I whip out my phone and go to Google.  I guess the Dr doesn’t have Google or a Medical Dictionary at the hospital (insert sarcasm).

After reading about it, a wave of relief washes over me.  I know what the discussion will be with the Specialist now!  It is treatable.  I will need major surgery.  I am excited.  Really, I am!

After researching more, I realize the many issues I am having with my body the past many years, I now know are directly linked to this one condition.  The surgery will fix these things!  

In less then a month I am looking forward to beginning the recovery process.  In the meantime, I have focused on eating well, taking my vitamins and supplements, keeping my blood sugars tight, getting enough sleep and walking.  Ideally, I would like to exercise more intensely to strengthen my muscles but I am not well enough for that.  I remind myself in a few months I will be able to.   I have been reassured by a few friends who have had the surgery that I will wake up one day on week six of the recovery and realize how great I feel, how rough I’ve felt these years.  The countdown is on.

I am looking forward to my new life.

“The secret of …

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“The secret of your future is hidden in your daily routine.” – Mike Murdock

In today’s society we are encouraged to break out, be stimulated, think outside the box.  We are told the less routine we adhere to the more abundant our life will become.  Becoming comfortable is to lose the opportunity to become a better person, to grow and expand our mind and soul.

In many aspects, breaking routine is without doubt a great thing.  Spontaneity can break one out of the doldrums, keep the mind sharp and create excitement.  

With respect to living with diabetes, having routine is essential.  It is proven that testing your blood sugars, taking your medications and insulin injections at the same time each day will increase your chances of success.  

To take it further, creating a routine with regards to healthy eating, meal and snack times is also of great benefit.  By pairing your medication or insulin routine with your meals and snacks, you will notice an increase in well being…once you are settled into your routine, ironing out the wrinkles.  After all, we are very personal in our diabetes.  Although we live with the same diagnosis, we are all unique in how we adapt to certain routines.

One last commitment which needs to be incorporated as part of your daily diabetes routine is physical activity.  The benefits of physical activity are as great as adhering to a routine with your medication, insulin and eating.  

The Centre of Disease Control cites the following as benefits to physical activity: 

By creating and committing to a routine, I hope this will enable you to live life with Diabetes Beyond Borders.