Too Good To Be True?

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Too Good To Be True?

I feel I am walking a fine line by being bold enough to post this. Initially, I thought it would so simple to post about how great Coconut Oil is because I use it & love the smell & taste.

As I investigate further, as with any other food, until further long-term clinical studies are done, it seems it’s not the cure-all for everything. This is not a post saying “don’t use coconut oil”, it’s merely to raise awareness that too much of anything can cause issues. I am not a dietician or nutritionist so please make sure to consult with yours before making any changes to your diet.

Compare Coconut Oil to Butter:

1 tbsp of coconut oil has 11.8g of saturated fat, 90% of the fat is Saturated Fat.

1 tbsp of butter has 7.2g of saturated fat, 63% of the fat is Saturated Fat.

Supporters of coconut oil claim even though it is very high in saturated fat it doesn’t increase bad cholesterol (LDL) because it is a medium-chain fatty acid versus a long-chain fatty acid which butter & other fats are.

After meeting, the World Health Organization, American Heart Association & the Dieticians of Canada agreed to recommend to the public that they should limit their consumption of significant amounts of coconut oil (as with any fat) due to the high saturated fat content.

According to the American Heart Association;

1. Heart disease & stroke are the #1 cause of death & disability among people with Type 2 diabetes
2. At least 65% of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke.
3. Adults with diabetes are 2 − 4 times more likely to have heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes.

There is no solid evidence that coconut oil can help in abdominal weight loss or cure Alzheimer’s. The few studies that I have found were short-term & small. There were loopholes in them & did not offer clinically relevant results to substantiate claims of eating it at will.

While recently there is clinical evidence showing it is possible that the link between saturated fat & heart disease is not as strong as once believed. The data out there still shows it’s best to still be mindful given the risk associated with diabetes & heart disease. It seems until they release real evidence that proves that coconut oil does benefit our cardiovascular health &/or that saturated fat is not linked to heart disease, moderation is the key.

Eden’s Journey – Part 3

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Eden's Journey - Part 3

So I thought I would post one of my favorite desserts! I always look for new stuff, since I cannot do the “just eat greens and plain chicken” idea of healthy eating…YUCK! I love different flavours, and ways of cooking so you may see a lot of recipes ha ha. I usually have 11 almonds at night with anything else I eat (I LOVE BBQ flavour almonds …mouth-watering hehe). This has been one of my favorite things to make for the last couple of weeks! I eat it along with my almonds and a giant chai tea. Also an FYI chai tea is great for diabetics! It cleanses your kidney, and it also has many other health benefits.
Ok so here is the recipe….SO EASY TO MAKE

Pumpkin Pie

1 cup of almond milk (I use this because there is no sugar in it, only 35 calories, and 2.5 grams of fat per cup…..I recommend Silk Unsweetened vanilla. It is awful drinking it on its own, but great in teas and desserts)
1 can of pumpkin (has only 3 grams of sugar in it for half the can!)
2 massive teaspoons of cinnamon (you can add more next time if you want it more “spicy”)
2 tablespoons of splenda (you can use stevia, but I stick with splenda since I know its yummy)
2 eggs

Mix together in a microwave safe bowl. It takes about 20-25 minutes…maybe longer depending on your microwave. Just keep checking it every 5 to 10 minutes so no one burns it! It should not be runny, and usually starts separating from the sides of the bowl. You can add Greek yogurt on top if you like it or a couple of walnuts. I like it chilled, so I put in the fridge once it is finished, but….sometimes I cannot wait haha I find it gets a bit firmer in the fridge.

I hope you enjoy, remember to follow me on instagram edenalexandriadaly I post a lot of pictures on their day-to-day!

Looking Back – Being a Teen with Type 1

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Looking Back - Being a Teen with Type 1

I know what it is like to grow up as a kid & teen living with Type 1 diabetes. It’s tough!

I’m going to give you a snapshot of how I lived life with diabetes as a teen….

First, I had a huge, gigantic glucose meter. See the pic! I had the blue one for many years. There was NO way that thing was going with me anywhere. I hated testing! The test strips of this meter took a ton of blood compared to today. The finger pricker had no dial! It had one setting. When it made contact with my finger it felt like it went through it. If anyone has been to diabetes camp & used the single use, disposable prickers, you know what I mean! It took 2 minutes for the test. I had better things to do then stand in front of my meter for 2 minutes to wait for a number…so guess what I didn’t do a lot of? Test!! I mean, I knew how I felt. I could manage my diabetes without having to look at a number! At least that’s what I believed at the time.

Secondly, even though I only had to take needles twice a day, I hated it. They hurt! The needles on the syringes that I used were 13mm long. Now, the word “millimetres” sounds small but if you take out a ruler & measure 13 mm & imagine that going into a lean body with little fat, it goes directly into the muscle. I was small at 115 pounds & 5’1″. I always took my insulin, the only time I didn’t inject was when I truly forgot. Then I would call my Mom & she would bring it to me…usually at school or work. I knew I couldn’t live without my insulin.

Next, I didn’t eat much. I now know that many young girls & even women will decrease their insulin dose and run slightly higher or stop eating as many calories to keep their weight down. It is known, insulin makes one fat. It’s not that this was my intention or that I was aware of that at the time but I figured if I didn’t eat as often, my sugars dipped low so I could eat McDonald’s or candies. “Back then” (boy I sound old!) there was no carb counting to allow for ‘treats’. There was also no ‘correction doses’. If you were high, you dealt with it until it came down on its own with the insulin you had on board.

I didn’t think about my diabetes much. I remember being terribly embarrassed when I had lows. I hated having attention drawn to me. I remember being tired a lot. I fell asleep in class in high school a lot. I had a hard time focusing.

The one thing I didn’t do when I was a teen was drink alcohol. My Mom scared the life out of me about what it could do to me and my diabetes, that I am thankful for. It was one less variable I had to deal with.

With that being said, at the age of 16, my parents found me in bed one morning, lying in my vomit, barely responsive. That night I had been out with my boyfriend & when I came home I was really, really tired. Instead of testing before bed, I crashed. Little did I realize, because I hadn’t tested, I was very low before I had even climbed into bed.

Laying in a hospital bed with an excruciating headache, the next day was the beginning of realizing my diabetes needed my attention. Pretending it wasn’t there and omitting what needed to be done to manage it was not serving a purpose. I was punishing myself. I was letting my diabetes take control of me.

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Be Ware!!! Nutritional Nightmares

Attached is an article posted in The Toronto Star.  It’s easy to believe that a food item listed as Vegan, Organic, Gluten Free, Lactose Free, Healthy, Low Fat, Fat Free is good for you.  Many products sold with these labels are, but as we read in this article, there are products touted as such but aren’t.  I urge you to read the ingredients listed, the Nutritional Facts on the packaging or go on-line or ask the company about gaining access to this info.