Losing and Loving It

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Losing and Loving It

Eden is SO busy!! This incredible young lady has energy abounding!!

Only a few days from the finish line of finishing her University Education, she has her nose to the grind. BUT….she has made the time to share with us more of her tips & tricks on her journey to losing weight in a healthy way while living with Type 1 diabetes.

Here is some more insight & inspiration….thank you Eden!!

“Hello Everyone,

Since I had an eventful couple days, I have not been able to post (after Saturday you will get one from me daily I promise!) So I weighed myself today and I lost 1.5 pounds….after a major plateau for a couple weeks and I am finally 172 pounds!!!!! SO HAPPY! Let me tell you I am learning a lot from about my own body on this journey!

I even learned a couple things this week.

First thing, I learned that cutting your sweetener intake ACTUALLY reduces your waist line. Now I am sure most of you use Splenda on EVERYTHING…believe me I did. On average I would use anywhere from 3-12 packets a day. In the last couple of months, I have been losing weight one week and having a plateau for 4…but as soon as I started using Truvia (Stevia) and using 1 Splenda with it, I started to see a change again. So if you can mix the Stevia and Splenda up, or just use Stevia.

Second thing, cheat days! Now lets talk about those glorious days ha ha. I follow a program where I do not eat very much gluten, and I eat 2 carb choices a day (these are usually a grain or sweet potato etc). On my program I should not have cheat days, and most people say it’s a lifestyle change and you can never have another regular cookie again. YEA RIGHT! For me (like today) I need a day sometimes to give my body something it wants because it makes me follow my program and see progress. Today I had 3 carb choices, a piece of cake and a small brownie (a bit too much sugar, but oh well). I NEVER have this every single day, and I haven’t had this much since Christmas. You do not gain all your weight back on because you had one bad day. You gain weight because you are not eating right the rest of the time. So if you splurge, do not quit! Get back on that horse the day after!

Third thing, people are so uneducated about Diabetes. Yet again in my town, I was taking insulin (by pen) in my stomach before I had my lunch on Friday…and someone came over to me and asked why I was doing a needle in public (I have actually been asked this a couple times). I explained I was Diabetic thinking she was curious, so I explained it further. During the first couple seconds of my speech, she looked like she wanted to hit me! After my speech she apologized, and thought I was taking a form of illegal drug in the local coffee shop when her child was present. I was like nope and kind of laughed it off, but I was shocked! I also have had the stupid arguments with people I know who were trying to educate me about my own disease saying it’s because I was overweight and ate too much sugar….Anyone else have this? Yes I could slap these people. If you have friends and family who know you have diabetes, maybe start educating them so they can educate others!

Sorry I had a long rant today HAHA.

Eden”

Healing

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Healing

I like to keep my body parts. I figure each one is there for a reason. But, when all other options have been exercised & surgery is the only option….well, reluctantly, I know when it’s time to fold ’em.

I am not new to surgery. I have had 4 surgeries between the ages of 21 – 32. I’m proud to say, I’ve had success with all surgeries & recoveries. It’s a challenge to walk away healthy without infection or complications, especially when living with diabetes.

It’s been 10 years since my last surgery. It’s been almost 20 years since my last major surgery.

When I found out a few months ago I would be under the knife once again, having major surgery with a 6 week recovery time, I decided to be proactive in preparing so my recovery would be uneventful.

I am only 4 days post op so I may be putting the cart before the horse with this surgery but I want to post some considerations about how to prepare before, during & after.

Before Surgery:

1. Gather a reliable support team that can be there for you before, during & after surgery. Make sure your team knows their responsibilities throughout this process. If someone offers to help, this is one time you can’t afford to say no. Don’t try to be a hero. I never heard anyone talking about the time “so and so had surgery & what a champ he or she was going solo, doing it all on their own.”

2. Don’t go crazy cooking, baking & cleaning. What?!? you say? Shouldn’t I have stuff in the freezer & the house spotless for when I come home to recover? Sure, if you were healthy before surgery to do that, it would be ideal. But consider, why are you having surgery? Your body is not running at full capacity. By stressing yourself out making, baking & cleaning you are depleting your immune system to a point that you may set yourself up for illness before surgery (then, it may be cancelled) or cause infection post-surgery. Although it may be tough, go to the local health food store & buy organic, pre-made meals that one of your team mates can heat up. Same with the kids lunches. I’m not meaning pre-packaged boxed/canned garbage…there are a variety of ‘homemade’ soups, sauces & meals available today that have only a few ingredients & are good for you. Just make sure to watch the sodium content…you don’t want to get all puffy & bloated.

3. Which leads me to my next point….eat clean, well-balanced nutritional meals & snacks leading up to surgery. I mean, we all should all the time but if you have lost focus, now is the time to get back on track. If you don’t have a Juicer, I urge you to buy one. Use it often. Eat a variety of fresh, organic vegetables & fruits. Keep your protein lean. Keep your carbs complex & low GI. If you nourish your body properly, it will be ready to perform at a high level of healing during & after surgery.

4. Test blood sugars more often. Keep them within target. Consult with your Diabetes Team to make sure you are running at optimal capacity for diabetes management. High sugars can cause infection and/or slow healing.

5. Be honest during your Pre-Op visit at the hospital about which meds you are taking. I mean, prescription, herbal & homeopathic remedies as well as essential fatty acids. I take herbal & homeopathic tinctures as well as EFA which I had to stop 2 weeks before surgery as they increased my risk for bleeding.

6. If you are physically active until this point, if the Specialist agrees it is okay, keep doing what you do or alter it to accommodate to your circumstance. I was not able to be as active as I used to be but I made sure to walk 5 – 10 km each day to keep my heart, lungs, mind & muscles working.

7. Get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep a night.

8. Drink a lot of water. More than 8-8oz glasses a day.

The Night Before Surgery:

1.  Pack a cooler bag of simple, instant food that is healthy & wholesome for your hospital visit. Below is what I packed in mine:

– Nature’s Path Organic Instant Oatmeal Plus Flax
– (2) glass jars of Green’s Juice I made with my Juicer
– (2) 1/4 cup containers of hemp seed to add to my oatmeal
– (2) containers of 2 tbsp of Skinny B Breakfast Cereal
– (2) containers of 2 tbsp of Holy Crap Breakfast Cereal
– (2) single servings of plain Greek Yogurt

The Day of Surgery:

1. Ask your surgery to be booked first thing in the morning. You will be asked to have nothing to eat or drink the night before. Some of your diabetes meds may be held. But, with the risk of fasting comes the risk of a low sugar. Being booked in the morning gives you the opportunity to have an IV put in place so that if you have a low blood sugar the staff can give you sugar through it.

2. Remember to breathe deeply, often. Stay calm. Getting anxious over the unknown & probably what won’t happen will raise your blood pressure, heart rate & blood sugar. All the hormones released that cause this will not help with the healing.

3. When you feel yourself getting anxious, visualize what you would love to do 6 weeks from now. Imagine yourself having a successful operation & healing process. Envision how much better you will feel afterwards.

3. Ask questions. Although they may seem dumb to you, they really aren’t.

4. Educate the team in the hospital about your diabetes. They don’t know as much as you do. They can’t! They don’t live with it.

5. Be your own advocate. If something doesn’t seem right, speak up.

The Hospital Stay:

1. Be aware of what’s on your food tray. For the 2 days I stayed, I was presented every processed juice & flavour of jello imaginable. Was that going to help my healing? Nope. It would just spike my sugars. I resorted to my cooler of food I brought. My Greens Juices got me through the first 24 hours. The oatmeal, hemp, yogurt & Skinny B got me through the rest of my stay. The nurses admired that I advocated for myself by bringing the cooler of food.

2. Take the pain meds. Again, don’t be a hero. No pain, no gain does not work. Pain releases hormones that will cause your sugars to go up….and your blood pressure and your heart rate…get it? 🙂 You will not get addicted.

3. Sleep and move. Sleep as much as you can. As soon as the nurse says it’s time to get out of bed, whether you just stand up or take a few steps, it is important to move. It gets the blood flowing which helps your surgical incision heal.

4. Test, test, test. The hospital staff will do that for you a lot too, but I bring my own meter as back up as well. It may not be calibrated to the hospital lab but at least I can report to them if it’s not time for them to test & I know something is off with my sugar. I also wear a Continuous Glucose Meter paired with my pump.

5. Be aware that the grogginess from pain meds can mask a low blood sugar.

6. Be aware of your body. Listen to it. Trust your gut. You know you best!

7. Drink lots of water! LOTS!!

Recovering At Home:

1. Abide by what the instruction sheet & the nursing staff have said. Don’t push yourself. You will not push yourself closer to recovery but closer to a risk of infection & slow it down.

2. Sleep a minimum of 8 hours a night, if your body says to go to bed at 8pm, do it.

3. Nap when you’re tired.

4. Be as mobile as your Doctor has permitted you to be.

5. Inspect your incision(s) daily. If they start to look red, inflamed or have discharge, you need to call your Doctor right away.

6. Test, test, test. Keep your sugars within target. I’ll repeat this again….high sugars will slow the healing process & promote infection.

7. Eat clean, eat well. Keep up with the Greens Juice. Eat lots of vegetables & fruits. Eat lean protein. Keep to low GI, complex carbs.

8. Call on your Team. Refer to #1 “Before Surgery”.

9. Drink lots of water. LOTS!!

These are general guidelines. Your circumstances may be unique & there may be some suggestions I have made that the Doctor has advised against or differently. Please listen to your Doctor. He & you, know your circumstance best.

Cravings

Want tips & tricks on eating well & losing weight? Here is Eden’s next Blog about her Journey. Eden is a busy woman!! She lives with Type 1, at the end of her years in University, about to graduate in May and working hard to lose weight & exercise so she is looking good for her height for graduation.

Help me support Eden in her goals as she moves closer to her goals!! Cheers, Tracy

“Hey Everyone!
Sorry my blogs have been so spaced out! Last week of classes so my blogs will be every other day lol Lots going on! So I thought I would share some of my favorite snacks that I tend to have during the evening. Sometimes in the evening is when I feel like eating the contents of my fridge ha ha! Before I started caring about my weight, I would typically not think twice about eating chips, cookies, 2 granola bars (sometimes more) and god knows what else! So it is hard to not want to eat at night, and I know if I don’t I will be hungry and probably have low blood sugars. So these are some of the things I now LOVE
1. One thing I always have is a drink of water, and a HUGE chai tea with one Truvia (or 2 splenda) and my almond milk. Almond milk takes a month or so to really get used to in beverages, but there is NO SUGAR and VERY LOW FAT! I LOVE IT!
2. Another thing I love having is almonds. I usually buy Blue Diamond Lime and Chili almonds, these are salted, but I only allow myself 11 at night if I choose this. If I choose this, I usually have 1 cup (usually 6) strawberries or a small apple with cinnamon baked for 1 minute in the microwave.
3. My Cheat Night Snacks: Ok so everyone has these, and if you were to tell me I would never have another chip or cookie again, I would die! So I figured out different ways to have things I love, but that are healthier for me. So tonight (for example) I had Special K cracker chips (they have sour cream and BBQ flavors) 18 cracker/chips are 80 calories, 1.5 grams of fat and 14 carbs! Compared to regular chips which are ten times the amount of fat and calories!
For cookies, I make my own which take 20 minutes MAX! I usually put in a bowl 1 cup of oatmeal, ½ cup of egg whites, 1 or 2 splenda, and I use half a scoop of chocolate protein powder (I think cocoa would be fine) I mix it all up and bake them in the oven for 10 minutes at 400 (depending on your oven, keep an eye on them!) I also like adding some natural peanut butter on top for some extra flavor. If you mix it up, and it seems dry add some more egg whites and some water 
Hopefully you like some of my ideas! I always have a chai tea because of its health benefits and it makes you feel full ”

Link

Loss of Control – How Do We Regain It

I urge you to read the link I have attached.  Although it is from the Canadian Diabetes Association, I have read many links which involve Diabetes Associations that exist around the globe.  It seems on paper the protocol is in place if the school board or district is agreeable to implement & support.  Every parent past & present that has a child with Type 1 fight to keep their child safe at school.  The fact that our children are not viewed as ‘in need’ of special care in their daily management of diabetes at school is preposterous.  Every diabetes organization is posting guidelines & lobbying for change but it is happening too slow.  While school boards fight to keep their budgets or manage with less, our children living with diabetes’ risks of adverse events occurring is higher.

Examples to support the lack of guidelines & the situations Kurtis met as a result:

1.  In Grade 5 his class is in a portable.  Soon after the school year starts, Kurtis comes home to tell me during class that day he feels like he is having a low blood sugar.  He tells his teacher.  He tests & confirms.  The teacher sends him by himself out from the portable into the school to the office to get a juice box.  He tells me he is scared.  Two issues:  there are juice boxes in the classroom AND most important, she sends my scared son BY HIMSELF outside to enter the school & walk up a long hall & a set of stairs to treat himself for a low blood sugar.  What if he didn’t make it?

2.  In this same class, it is the middle of winter.  A similar event occurs.

3.  I discuss with the teacher the concern.  She explains she can not expect a student to go with him as they need to be in the class to learn.  She offers she can not leave the class to go with him & leave them on their own.

4.  I discuss my concerns with the principal.  She meets with the teacher & enforces a student needs to go with Kurtis when going to the office for a low…IF….there are NO juice boxes in the classroom.

5.  At one point, Kurtis has a severe low at school.  I meet with the principal & discuss options of having Glucagon for treatment if he becomes unable to take treatment orally.  She informs me the school board will not allow her or the staff to inject Glucagon.  I ask if children that have severe anaphylaxis to bee’s & peanuts have Epi-Pen’s at school?  She says “yes”.  I ask if the staff are allowed to inject the Epi-Pen if such an event occurs. She says “yes”.  I point out to her that both events need life saving injection of a drug.  She counters that she can call an ambulance with Kurtis & by the time they get to the school he will be okay.  I was furious.  How do you educate someone who is such an imbecile?  So stuck on the rules that they won’t consider a child’s life could be at jeopardy?

How did I deal with this?  I made myself on-call regardless whether I was sleeping from a night shift.  If I was working a 12-hour day, I was fortunate my parents were on stand-by.  I made it clear that the school was not to call 911 first (as the school was in the country), they call me.  I knew I could make it to the school quicker than the ambulance could.

Thankfully, with regards to his diabetes, nothing serious happened.

I am not sure how to make an impact to sway school boards to start a standardized protocol that allows for a budget for help in overseeing glucose testing, injecting & bolus of insulin, eating the correct food & bringing attention to the proper person the needs of a child with Type 1.  I do suggest lobbying & pressure by our local diabetes associations as well as supporting them in their campaign is instrumental.  Many voices are louder than one.  I urge you to take part.

Too Good To Be True?

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Too Good To Be True?

I feel I am walking a fine line by being bold enough to post this. Initially, I thought it would so simple to post about how great Coconut Oil is because I use it & love the smell & taste.

As I investigate further, as with any other food, until further long-term clinical studies are done, it seems it’s not the cure-all for everything. This is not a post saying “don’t use coconut oil”, it’s merely to raise awareness that too much of anything can cause issues. I am not a dietician or nutritionist so please make sure to consult with yours before making any changes to your diet.

Compare Coconut Oil to Butter:

1 tbsp of coconut oil has 11.8g of saturated fat, 90% of the fat is Saturated Fat.

1 tbsp of butter has 7.2g of saturated fat, 63% of the fat is Saturated Fat.

Supporters of coconut oil claim even though it is very high in saturated fat it doesn’t increase bad cholesterol (LDL) because it is a medium-chain fatty acid versus a long-chain fatty acid which butter & other fats are.

After meeting, the World Health Organization, American Heart Association & the Dieticians of Canada agreed to recommend to the public that they should limit their consumption of significant amounts of coconut oil (as with any fat) due to the high saturated fat content.

According to the American Heart Association;

1. Heart disease & stroke are the #1 cause of death & disability among people with Type 2 diabetes
2. At least 65% of people with diabetes die from some form of heart disease or stroke.
3. Adults with diabetes are 2 − 4 times more likely to have heart disease or stroke than adults without diabetes.

There is no solid evidence that coconut oil can help in abdominal weight loss or cure Alzheimer’s. The few studies that I have found were short-term & small. There were loopholes in them & did not offer clinically relevant results to substantiate claims of eating it at will.

While recently there is clinical evidence showing it is possible that the link between saturated fat & heart disease is not as strong as once believed. The data out there still shows it’s best to still be mindful given the risk associated with diabetes & heart disease. It seems until they release real evidence that proves that coconut oil does benefit our cardiovascular health &/or that saturated fat is not linked to heart disease, moderation is the key.

Eden’s Worst Nightmare

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Eden's Worst Nightmare

Below is a mind-blowing 2 minute read.  Eden’s diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes came at the age of 17. After gaining a lot of weight & feeling she did not have the support from the health care profession she needed to empower herself, Eden set out on her own to learn & discover how to live life with diabetes beyond borders. Eden has a very busy life, finishing her degree at University as well as setting goals to manage her diabetes & lose weight in a healthy way before her graduation in May.

Support Eden as she moves forward daily in her journey to empower herself living with diabetes & successfully meet a weight that is healthy for her body. What she is achieving since being diagnosed 4 years ago is nothing short of amazing!

“Hey Everyone,
Sorry I was away since Thursday with the family for a weekend shopping trip! We had a lot of fun.

So I thought I would write on a mix of things today !

When I was away this weekend I tried to behave the best I could (even though some regular chocolate just happened to work its way in their LOL) I got some diabetic/sugarless candy from my family today ….I had chai tea candies…soooo good! Go to Bulkbarn and get some!

I thought I would share some more personal stuff, since I know everyone grapples with this when trying/thinking about losing weight.

One big deciding factor when trying to lose weight is …why are you losing weight? I do not know about you, but just saying “to be healthy and be slim” can be a very vague reason to start to lose weight….Plus this is a LONG term goal.

A HUGE recommendation I have is to sit down, with a pen and paper and write small term goals to lose weight. For example here are some of mine (some I have already accomplished, some I have not)

1. Be able to do the stair master for longer then 10 minutes (I can do 45 now!)
2. Test my blood sugar 4-5 times a day (I have been good on this lately)
3. Go to the gym 4-5 times a week (finally getting this habit)
4. Get to second goal weight 165 (I hope to be here around May 10th this year)
5. Drink 8 glasses of water a day (very hard to do ….lol and not much fun)
6. Take vitamins every day
7. Be able to feel confident when I am in public
8. Be able to wear clothes that are comfortable and make me look and feel AMAZING
9. Have more self-confidence when doing day-today stuff
10. Be fit and ready trying on wedding dresses.

OK I wrote 10 of my 20 down lol Some of these are going to take a lot of work for me (especially 7 and 9). I have always struggled with self-confidence issues. But one incident that really hurt me I will discuss since I think most have gone through a similar situation.

Two years ago during the summer my boyfriend (who is beyond amazing in every way) and his friends wanted to go to the beach down the street. Now a big girl with confidence issues does not get excited about this! I literally felt my blood sugars go up from stress and I did not want to go. This would involve me being in a bathing suit, wet and in front of people in shape….needless to say WORST NIGHTMARE.

I decided to go since I also did not want to be home alone (which would make me feel worse). So I went…I sat on the beach with jeans, a black hoodie and tank, and running shoes (put in mind it was 30 degrees out!) I was hot, I felt fat and awful and everyone was having a great time in bikinis swimming. I luckily had sun glasses on because I started to cry.

Every time I feel like eating something like a whole cake or a bag of chips, I think of that day. I felt so left out, and awful! Yes everyone cheats once and awhile, but I refuse to ever feel like that again. So I hope you guys push yourself, like walking an extra 5 minutes, or eating popcorn instead of cake, etc etc.

I thought I would share ! Hopefully I keep inspiring you guys: :)”

To Be Blunt

Video

My friend Jeremy who is a nutritionist & fitness trainer has a genetic pre disposition to Type 2 diabetes. Ultimately, his Doctor gave him the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes.

Listen to Jeremy’s synopsis of his diagnosis & the lifestyle changes he is now living to overcome his diagnosis. In shock, Jeremy’s Doctor told him he no longer lived with Type 2.  Jeremy told him & he is now sharing with you how he was able to stop it in its tracks.

Enjoy!!