I am an Endless Legend

This morning I scan Facebook for motivation and laughs.  I hate the news. Rarely do I search out news.  I am skeptical in its presentation versus reality.

Within the search, I find this.

Seb’s video motivates me.  Focus on today.  Small steps.  That’s all I hear.

Tonight I find a hoodie with my Maiden name which has a saying….

“I am an Endless Legend.”

And I feel like I can be a Super Hero.  Yep that’s right.  Click on the link to see what motivates me to write about it.

http://www.sunfrogshirts.com/DOUGHTY-3254-White-29514080-Hoodie.html?23035

My maiden name is Doughty.

Today our temps reach above 0C.

I am closing in on living with Type 1 diabetes for 40 years.  Exercise, activity, healthy eating and keeping myself in shape and healthy is important to me.

BUT, It’s been a rough few months exercise and otherwise for me. Winter and I don’t get along as far as energy and ambition.  The month of February in Ontario was the coldest on record since 1875.

Word on the Weather Network is temps will reach upwards of about 6C.   It will feel balmy if it is true!  No wind would be nice too!  I haven’t heard about the records set for wind this winter but one must exist!!

Today I work from home finishing up some Admin that’s been driving me crazy. The sun shines bright all day. The bright sun gleaming through the windows blinds me at times. Despite that, I embrace the intensity of it.

Suddenly the hope appears with the time change and the increase in the intensity of the sun.

About 5pm, I take a break from the Admin work I focus on all day.  I put on my ear buds and hook up my music. I make my way to the ‘super mailbox’ up the road to get our mail. It feels so good to get out.  I can’t stop looking to my left, smiling at the sun as it made its way down the sky to sleep for the night.   Today, I am thankful for the gift the sun has given.

I wish the roads allowed for me to put on my running shoes and go, but I can’t stand wet feet…and not good for the well being of them either.

Knowing I can’t let this time go, I take the ‘long’ walk home.

Thankfully, we live right off the Trans Canada Trail…it is just a few minutes walk from our home. I am excited to make my way there as soon as the snow melts and puddles aren’t ankle deep to get my running gear on and go…for miles and miles.

Despite the fact I wear my Blundstones, to keep my feet dry tonight, I want to run so bad. It is so hard not too.

In anticipation of this, I find a post on FB of a T and hoodie that include my Maiden name…and I fall in love. So, I ordered a few work out T’s and a hoodie.

And one for my Dad…cause if it wasn’t for him….I wouldn’t be an Endless Legend!

What do you do to motivate yourself to move?

P.S. Pink is my favourite colour…of what I ordered, I picked a bright pink tee…and I while I wear my fav colour I will remember while I am running or lifting weights…. “I am an endless legend.” for so many reasons.

Meat Sauce

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Meat Sauce

Here is my favourite recipe for spaghetti sauce. I substitute pasta noodles for spaghetti squash for my plate. The rest of the gang prefers pasta noodles. I always double this & freeze, it makes a lot!!

Ingredients:

2-3 tbsp olive oil
2 onions, chopped
1 head garlic, minced
2 lbs of ground meat (chicken, turkey, beef)
1 tbsp + 1/2 tsp salt
2 1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
2 tsp paprika
2 (28oz) cans tomato sauce
2 (28oz) cans tomato puree
2 tbsp dried basil
2 bay leaves, cracked
1/2 tsp cayenne pepper
6 tbsp finely chopped fresh parsley
1/2 tsp dried oregano
1 cup of red wine

Directions:

Heat a large stockpot on medium heat.
Add the olive oil & onions. Saute until the onions are translucent, about 7-10 minutes.
Add the garlic & saute 1-2 minutes longer.
Add the ground beef & sauté until brown.
Season the meat with about 1/2 tsp salt, 1/2 tsp pepper & the paprika.
Add all 5 cans of tomatoes.
Add 1 tbsp salt, 2 tsp pepper, the basil, bay leaves, cayenne, parsley, oregano & red wine.
Stir until all ingredients until well combined.
Bring to a low boil then lower heat & simmer 1-4 hours. The sauce will be ready in 1 hour but tastes better the longer you simmer it.

Makes about 4 quarts.

Healing

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Healing

I like to keep my body parts. I figure each one is there for a reason. But, when all other options have been exercised & surgery is the only option….well, reluctantly, I know when it’s time to fold ’em.

I am not new to surgery. I have had 4 surgeries between the ages of 21 – 32. I’m proud to say, I’ve had success with all surgeries & recoveries. It’s a challenge to walk away healthy without infection or complications, especially when living with diabetes.

It’s been 10 years since my last surgery. It’s been almost 20 years since my last major surgery.

When I found out a few months ago I would be under the knife once again, having major surgery with a 6 week recovery time, I decided to be proactive in preparing so my recovery would be uneventful.

I am only 4 days post op so I may be putting the cart before the horse with this surgery but I want to post some considerations about how to prepare before, during & after.

Before Surgery:

1. Gather a reliable support team that can be there for you before, during & after surgery. Make sure your team knows their responsibilities throughout this process. If someone offers to help, this is one time you can’t afford to say no. Don’t try to be a hero. I never heard anyone talking about the time “so and so had surgery & what a champ he or she was going solo, doing it all on their own.”

2. Don’t go crazy cooking, baking & cleaning. What?!? you say? Shouldn’t I have stuff in the freezer & the house spotless for when I come home to recover? Sure, if you were healthy before surgery to do that, it would be ideal. But consider, why are you having surgery? Your body is not running at full capacity. By stressing yourself out making, baking & cleaning you are depleting your immune system to a point that you may set yourself up for illness before surgery (then, it may be cancelled) or cause infection post-surgery. Although it may be tough, go to the local health food store & buy organic, pre-made meals that one of your team mates can heat up. Same with the kids lunches. I’m not meaning pre-packaged boxed/canned garbage…there are a variety of ‘homemade’ soups, sauces & meals available today that have only a few ingredients & are good for you. Just make sure to watch the sodium content…you don’t want to get all puffy & bloated.

3. Which leads me to my next point….eat clean, well-balanced nutritional meals & snacks leading up to surgery. I mean, we all should all the time but if you have lost focus, now is the time to get back on track. If you don’t have a Juicer, I urge you to buy one. Use it often. Eat a variety of fresh, organic vegetables & fruits. Keep your protein lean. Keep your carbs complex & low GI. If you nourish your body properly, it will be ready to perform at a high level of healing during & after surgery.

4. Test blood sugars more often. Keep them within target. Consult with your Diabetes Team to make sure you are running at optimal capacity for diabetes management. High sugars can cause infection and/or slow healing.

5. Be honest during your Pre-Op visit at the hospital about which meds you are taking. I mean, prescription, herbal & homeopathic remedies as well as essential fatty acids. I take herbal & homeopathic tinctures as well as EFA which I had to stop 2 weeks before surgery as they increased my risk for bleeding.

6. If you are physically active until this point, if the Specialist agrees it is okay, keep doing what you do or alter it to accommodate to your circumstance. I was not able to be as active as I used to be but I made sure to walk 5 – 10 km each day to keep my heart, lungs, mind & muscles working.

7. Get a minimum of 8 hours of sleep a night.

8. Drink a lot of water. More than 8-8oz glasses a day.

The Night Before Surgery:

1.  Pack a cooler bag of simple, instant food that is healthy & wholesome for your hospital visit. Below is what I packed in mine:

– Nature’s Path Organic Instant Oatmeal Plus Flax
– (2) glass jars of Green’s Juice I made with my Juicer
– (2) 1/4 cup containers of hemp seed to add to my oatmeal
– (2) containers of 2 tbsp of Skinny B Breakfast Cereal
– (2) containers of 2 tbsp of Holy Crap Breakfast Cereal
– (2) single servings of plain Greek Yogurt

The Day of Surgery:

1. Ask your surgery to be booked first thing in the morning. You will be asked to have nothing to eat or drink the night before. Some of your diabetes meds may be held. But, with the risk of fasting comes the risk of a low sugar. Being booked in the morning gives you the opportunity to have an IV put in place so that if you have a low blood sugar the staff can give you sugar through it.

2. Remember to breathe deeply, often. Stay calm. Getting anxious over the unknown & probably what won’t happen will raise your blood pressure, heart rate & blood sugar. All the hormones released that cause this will not help with the healing.

3. When you feel yourself getting anxious, visualize what you would love to do 6 weeks from now. Imagine yourself having a successful operation & healing process. Envision how much better you will feel afterwards.

3. Ask questions. Although they may seem dumb to you, they really aren’t.

4. Educate the team in the hospital about your diabetes. They don’t know as much as you do. They can’t! They don’t live with it.

5. Be your own advocate. If something doesn’t seem right, speak up.

The Hospital Stay:

1. Be aware of what’s on your food tray. For the 2 days I stayed, I was presented every processed juice & flavour of jello imaginable. Was that going to help my healing? Nope. It would just spike my sugars. I resorted to my cooler of food I brought. My Greens Juices got me through the first 24 hours. The oatmeal, hemp, yogurt & Skinny B got me through the rest of my stay. The nurses admired that I advocated for myself by bringing the cooler of food.

2. Take the pain meds. Again, don’t be a hero. No pain, no gain does not work. Pain releases hormones that will cause your sugars to go up….and your blood pressure and your heart rate…get it? 🙂 You will not get addicted.

3. Sleep and move. Sleep as much as you can. As soon as the nurse says it’s time to get out of bed, whether you just stand up or take a few steps, it is important to move. It gets the blood flowing which helps your surgical incision heal.

4. Test, test, test. The hospital staff will do that for you a lot too, but I bring my own meter as back up as well. It may not be calibrated to the hospital lab but at least I can report to them if it’s not time for them to test & I know something is off with my sugar. I also wear a Continuous Glucose Meter paired with my pump.

5. Be aware that the grogginess from pain meds can mask a low blood sugar.

6. Be aware of your body. Listen to it. Trust your gut. You know you best!

7. Drink lots of water! LOTS!!

Recovering At Home:

1. Abide by what the instruction sheet & the nursing staff have said. Don’t push yourself. You will not push yourself closer to recovery but closer to a risk of infection & slow it down.

2. Sleep a minimum of 8 hours a night, if your body says to go to bed at 8pm, do it.

3. Nap when you’re tired.

4. Be as mobile as your Doctor has permitted you to be.

5. Inspect your incision(s) daily. If they start to look red, inflamed or have discharge, you need to call your Doctor right away.

6. Test, test, test. Keep your sugars within target. I’ll repeat this again….high sugars will slow the healing process & promote infection.

7. Eat clean, eat well. Keep up with the Greens Juice. Eat lots of vegetables & fruits. Eat lean protein. Keep to low GI, complex carbs.

8. Call on your Team. Refer to #1 “Before Surgery”.

9. Drink lots of water. LOTS!!

These are general guidelines. Your circumstances may be unique & there may be some suggestions I have made that the Doctor has advised against or differently. Please listen to your Doctor. He & you, know your circumstance best.

To Be Blunt

Video

My friend Jeremy who is a nutritionist & fitness trainer has a genetic pre disposition to Type 2 diabetes. Ultimately, his Doctor gave him the diagnosis of Type 2 diabetes.

Listen to Jeremy’s synopsis of his diagnosis & the lifestyle changes he is now living to overcome his diagnosis. In shock, Jeremy’s Doctor told him he no longer lived with Type 2.  Jeremy told him & he is now sharing with you how he was able to stop it in its tracks.

Enjoy!!

For most diagno…

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For most diagnoses all that is needed is an ounce of knowledge, an ounce of intelligence, and a pound of thoroughness. – Anonymous

In January, for the second time in two months I arrive in the Emergency Department.  

I have to be in pretty rough shape to go there.  I can count on one hand how often I have gone for myself.  Having worked in the ER, I have seen people’s definition of what an emergency is.   I don’t want to be one of those people.  But, here I am doubled over in pain again.  Just before heading out the door, I stand with my hands shaking, heart pounding, crying…Googling my symptoms one more time, trying to find a diagnosis that I can fix so I don’t have to go.  Then I think to myself…what if I am dying of something and they can treat it?  That would be really stupid!

So off I go.  The Triage Nurse asks what’s happening.  I tell her.  She takes my history.  Takes my blood pressure.  WHOA!!  I guess I am in pain….155/100.  Ok, I feel a little more justified in being there.  They take me right in.  Ok, I’m feeling even more justified.  

The ER Doctor comes into assess me and has already looked up my health history from the past 10 years! That’s a first!!  I describe to him what I have and am presently experiencing.  I tell him my thoughts about it.  I tell him the tests I have had.  He urgently orders a shot of pain medication in my hip.  The nurse comes in and tells me that it will sting a bit as it is going in.  As she injects it, I comment to her that it doesn’t really hurt.  THEN, she pulls the needle out and man, oh, man…talk about a delayed reaction!!  The burn!  But, if it was going to take the pain away, the burn was the least of my discomfort.

The thorough assessment by the Doc gave me some reassurance that this time there would be a diagnosis.  Although I had an Ultrasound and a CT Scan from my earlier ER visit, which showed nothing, the Dr insists I should have another CT Scan.  In my mind, I am thinking MRI! MRI!  But I figure I will humour him.  

Finally the pain med begins to take the edge off.  During the Ultrasound, the Tech is taking the probe across one spot in particular, over and over.  Let me tell you, that was fun…NOT!  A necessary evil.  Finally, she asks if I have a had a different type of Ultrasound.  I have not and feel a sense of relief that she is deciding to do this.  Afterwards, she informs me the ER Dr will talk with us about the results when we go back to Emerg.  She sends us on our way.

Back in the ER, it takes the Dr a bit of time before he comes to speak with us.  I am terrified. Is it, he still doesn’t know or something very serious?

He tells us he has spoken with a Specialist and tells me I have a condition called Adenomyosis.  OK!  I have an answer.  I have a condition.  BUT, what is it, I ask.  He says he doesn’t know, he has never heard of it.  Huh?!?  So is it treatable?  Is it something I have to live with the rest of my life, because pain and diabetes management don’t go well together.  Is it terminal?  He tells us the Specialist wants to see me in a week to discuss treatment options.  In the meantime, he sends me home on Tylenol #3’s and prescription NSAID’s.

I whip out my phone and go to Google.  I guess the Dr doesn’t have Google or a Medical Dictionary at the hospital (insert sarcasm).

After reading about it, a wave of relief washes over me.  I know what the discussion will be with the Specialist now!  It is treatable.  I will need major surgery.  I am excited.  Really, I am!

After researching more, I realize the many issues I am having with my body the past many years, I now know are directly linked to this one condition.  The surgery will fix these things!  

In less then a month I am looking forward to beginning the recovery process.  In the meantime, I have focused on eating well, taking my vitamins and supplements, keeping my blood sugars tight, getting enough sleep and walking.  Ideally, I would like to exercise more intensely to strengthen my muscles but I am not well enough for that.  I remind myself in a few months I will be able to.   I have been reassured by a few friends who have had the surgery that I will wake up one day on week six of the recovery and realize how great I feel, how rough I’ve felt these years.  The countdown is on.

I am looking forward to my new life.