Reassurances

I am dedicating this to my friend Dee who has concerns that she will develop the mindset of an ‘old Diabetic’.  This mindset consists of being scared to death that having short-term high blood sugars will cause amputation, heart disease, kidney disease and stroke.

As a result of these fears, in the past many ‘old Diabetics’ learned to avoid high blood sugars, purposely running very tight sugars on old insulin such as Lente®, Humulin® L, NPH, Humulin® N, Toronto® and Humulin® R.  As a result the experiences of multiple moderate to severe low blood sugars occurred daily and weekly.  ‘Old Diabetics’ were not taught the mindset that a severe low could kill them or cause damage as well.  I know this all to well because I am one of ‘those’ ‘old Diabetics’.  Sadly, today many still live life like this despite the new technologies and choices we have to manage our diabetes.

I am not supporting anything more than the targets set for you or the A1C you need to achieve to attain a healthy life, but I do believe achieving these go beyond numbers and are associated with the mindset of getting there.

Whether you are an ‘old Diabetic’ or not, being diagnosed and living with diabetes can be empowering AND daunting.  You change your lifestyle to live healthier, a big bonus!  After feeling good about your accomplishments you suddenly experience a setback.  So frustrating!

Do you recall this picture?  Do you see an old hag or a young woman?  Can you change your perception of what you initially see?  It is so hard!

Old hag or young woman

 

It is the same with our diabetes.  What do we see when we look at our lives with diabetes?  How do we change our perception?

Reassurances

Is this picture of a lane a challenge that may be snowy and slippery leading to the unknown, possibly a struggle to walk back up, heart beating fast, muscles burning?  Oh the worry over what could be a beautiful journey if the perception is changed.  Or do you see the pleasure of an enjoyable walk with relaxing views including a beautiful winter blue sky in the horizon?  Do you see it?

How can I reassure you that you can manage your diabetes and avoid the things you fear?  Honestly, I can’t.

What I can reassure you is; YOU are not bad.  You are you as a person first who lives with a chronic disease called diabetes.  Don’t connect the two as to who you are and your accomplishments as a person.

You are not your sugars.  You are not your diabetes.  When I hear the statement “I’ve been bad.”, the next words out of my mouth are; “Hey, do you have diabetes???”.  We both laugh and I say, “That’s why you have high and low blood sugars!, HEY, You have diabetes!!”

So how can I reassure you?  I have changed my view of being an ‘old Diabetic’.

I see the picture differently now.  Do you know why?  Living with diabetes isn’t just about me.  What I understand now is that if I choose to not ‘play the game’.  If I choose to not adhere to the rules, if I choose to keep my perspective as an ‘old Diabetic’ and not learn a new perspective, I am not the only one I am hurting.

Who saves me or helps when I decide to run too tight and too low?  Who is SO scared that they may lose me because I was afraid of a short term high or got crazy keeping my sugars too tight?  It’s not me!

Reassurances

ReassurancesI have given my heart and soul raising my 2 beautiful children into young adulthood, I want to continue doing that.  In particular to my son Kurtis as he begins his life living with diabetes independently.

I want to live life. I want grow old with Steve and be able to fully enjoy our journey together.  I don’t him to worry about me.  He has to deal with my choices I make with my diabetes now and in the future.

 

So, with this, these are my reassurances to you:

You can live with diabetes.

You will change your perspective each day on how that will happen.

Through trial and error you will find your groove.

Do not fear the unknown.  Work with what you have today and change your game plan and perspective as need be.  BUT stick to the rules.

You are not bad no matter what the numbers say, the only change you need to make when you see them is to make it better, for your sake and for those you love.

Being “Normal”

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What does every parent want when their child lives with Type 1 diabetes & it’s any special event whether it be Christmas, Hallowe’en, Birthday Parties or Easter? To portray it’s the one of the few times of their life they can enjoy what everyone else does. Well, sort of. But that’s the best we can offer, right? Do they remember or know any different? Kurtis never told me so. I don’t remember so.

From the ages of 8-11 I don’t remember what I did with Kurtis at Hallowe’en. That was the time when he took multiple daily injections. Life was a whirl wind. I worked shift work at the hospital. My whole life evolved around my children…I worked my job, my health, my diabetes…everything around the kids. I was a single parent a lot. I didn’t have a team mate I could pass the baton to & ask to take over. My focus consisted of; were the kids fed well, did they have lunches packed for school, were they doing well in school, were Kurtis’ blood sugars okay, what did I need to do make them ok, appointments for his diabetes, making sure Cayla didn’t feel like Kurtis was the centre of our family because of his diabetes, what did the kids have for homework, hockey, figure skating, testing Kurtis’ blood sugars day & night to keep him safe, setting my alarm to check him, arranging care for the kids for the few times I wasn’t there, making sure the people caring for him understood what to do with his diabetes…you get the whirl wind?

Do I remember what I did for Hallwe’en on injections? Vaguely. I know for a fact I would have kept his candy intake balanced so that his sugars weren’t crazy for days. I vaguely remember letting him pig out the night of after he returned from collecting his stash..to an extent. Then going forward matching meals with treats to keep it balanced.

Once Kurtis was on a pump, I was not so concerned. My mindset was eat it all sooner then later so that we have 1 week of craziness then 3-4 weeks of drawing it out & really messing things up. The bonus was he could put the carbs in his pump & burn it off with activity. I was lucky because Kurtis only liked certain candies. The rest he would never touch.

Christmas stockings & Easter hunts involved a lot of non-candy things from Wal-Mart & the dollar store. I kept it the same for both. The kids never said to me “where is my candy” or “why don’t get as much candy as the other kids”. I remember as a child living with Type 1 finding a brand new pair of running shoes (which I needed!) hidden for Easter! I was SO excited because they were the cool pair I wanted! You can’t substitute candy for something so wonderful as that!

Creativity & letting normalcy rule within the boundaries of keeping your child safe, is essential to an enjoyable, stress-free Hallowe’en.

An Unexpected Anniversary

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An Unexpected Anniversary

October 30, 2000 I am in the kitchen baking up Halloween treats for the kids Halloween parties at school. I loved these moments. The excitement, the energy, the creativity. Halloween was so much fun.

But…that day transitioned into a life I never thought I would ever entertain on October 31, 2000. That was the day I learned I would become the parent of a child with Type 1 diabetes.

On the morning of October 31st I got the kids ready for school. I packed the plastic containers with Halloween baked goods & saw them on the bus.

That afternoon as the kids unloaded off the bus & I walked them in the door asking how their day went & how their Halloween parties went, Kurtis say’s the words a parent does not want to hear.

“I didn’t eat any treats today because I felt sick to my tummy & drank & peed all day.”

I felt the energy drain out of my body. I didn’t even have to test him. I knew.

I asked Kurtis if Mommy could poke his finger like Mommy does to test her sugar. He flat out refused. I was on my own so did not have the help of another adult to convince him otherwise. Luckily I happen to still have Keto-Diastix in the bathroom. After I dipped & confirmed what I already knew with 4+ sugar & negative ketones, I placed the call to my GP’s office. He reassured me that based on the fact he had no ketones, take him out for Halloween as usual but don’t allow him to eat any treats loaded with sugar & bring him in first thing in the morning. At that point we would begin the transition to insulin with education to be a parent of a child with Type 1 & subsequently living with it.

Initially, the next 2 nights were the hardest. Halloween involved me trying to portray it was a normal night out with the kids trick or treating. With the exception that my 7 year old baby had just learned he had diabetes like his Mom. He would have to take needles & poke his fingers & have low blood sugars that didn’t look nice. As we walked up the road, from house to house, Kurtis would throw himself on the side of the road belly first & wail “I don’t want diabetes” or “I hate diabetes.”. I would leave him briefly then say as I tried not to cry “Okay Buddy, l know it sucks. Let’s go to the next house & trick or treat.” I honestly didn’t know how else to be. I knew he had to grieve even though it was about something he didn’t quite understand in it’s entirety but knew starting tomorrow he would begin to learn the essence of what living with diabetes was about. He only understood the external ‘bad’ things with diabetes….severe lows, needles & finger pokes. He didn’t yet understand the other side….how he’d feel being low, high, going to the Dr’s the next day to have blood drawn or the complexity of counting carbs, the demand it would have on his body & mind 24-7-365 & the ridicule he would receive at school for years to come.

The next day was emotionally distressing for both of us. I was the only parent present. His father refused to come home from out of town to support this critical event or his family.

While Cayla went to school, Kurtis & I made our way to the GP’s office. After a lot of coercion we finally tested Kurtis’ sugar by finger poke to determine his fasting sugar was 13.5 mmol/L. I blamed myself. I felt guilty. What have I done to my child?

The GP called the Paediatrician’s office & the hospital to arrange an appointment at the Adult Diabetes Clinic as there was no Paediatric clinic at that time.

We knew the Paediatrician from 6 years prior when Kurtis had an anaphylactic reaction to Benadryl & severely ill with chicken pox in which he almost died at the age of 1. We chatted briefly & said to me…”Mom, you have Type 1 & you’re a nurse, you know what to do. I’d rather not put him in the hospital so here’s the prescription for the insulin.” He gave me the dose to give him & sent me off to the hospital to learn how to carb count.

Once at the hospital I sat with the dietician as she taught me how to carb count. The entire visit Kurtis had marker in hand. Standing in front of a flip chart he wrote time & time again in big 7 year old letters “I HATE DIABETES” “I HATE DIABETES” “I HATE DIABETES”. It hurt so much to watch but I knew it was good for him to get it out. Me? I was on robot mode. Survival. Take it in. Learn it. Function. Sacrifice emotion for taking good care of my baby. Helping him through this time so that he accepted & transitioned into such a terrible diagnosis.

Once home, I explained to Cayla what had happened during that day. She was 9 & a mature 9. She grasped it fairly easily & knew she had to step back & let me care for Kurtis for a little while. Closing into supper time I explained to Kurtis that just like Mommy he will test his blood & take a needle. That’s where it didn’t go so well. Testing his sugar was a bit of challenge but doable. He tested at 32 mmol/L. I explained to him that he really needed his insulin to bring his sugar down as I didn’t want to have to take him to the hospital & have someone else do it. He didn’t care. He just didn’t want the needle.

After about an hour of trying to convince him, going into another room & having a little cry on my own, I called my Mom. Knowing she had been through worse then me with my diagnosis, I asked for her help. When Mom arrived my head was spinning, Kurtis was crying & Cayla was trying to keep the calm in a whirlwind of frenzy. I was also angry because his father wasn’t present in a time we all needed him.

In my mind I can still see Kurtis sitting on the kitchen chair on an angle from the table explaining to me in tears how he doesn’t want the needle & his rationale as to why he doesn’t need it. His eyes swollen with tears pleaded to me & it broke my heart. Thankfully my Mom had already been through the heartache of my diagnosis at age 5. She had raised a child with Type 1.

In her calm, she finally convinced Kurtis to let me inject in his arm.

After I got the kids settled to bed, I cried & cried. I felt it was my fault. I caused this.

How did I move forward? My Mom asked me a question that changed my attitude which helped me transition to a Mom accepting she has a child with Type 1 diabetes. “Would you have had him if you knew he would get Type 1?”

No regrets. It sucks but attitude & the choice to transition to a new life is essential to living life with Diabetes Beyond Borders. This year is another Diabeteversary. October 31, 2013 Kurtis has lived with Type 1 for 13 years. The transition continues.

Trick or Treat

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Trick or Treat

October 31st is a significant day for me. I have 3 major memories that I associate with this day.

1. Going out for Hallowe’en as a child living with Type 1 diabetes.

2. October 31, 2000 is the day I dipped my 7 year old son Kurtis’ urine to discover he had 4+ sugar and thankfully no ketones but knew he had developed Type 1 diabetes. I dipped his urine as he refused to let me test his sugar with a glucose meter. I had poked his fingers 2 years earlier and knew this day would come.

3. I became a parent of a child with Type 1 diabetes trying to figure out how to let him enjoy going out for Hallowe’en without allowing his blood sugars to go askew.

This Blog is 1 of 3 parts sharing my experiences with October 31st.

Part 1:

When I was a child there were no pumps, rapid acting insulin or carb counting. My Mom did not have the technology at her finger tips to count carbs, push a button &/or inject & eat the treats. For the first few years, my Mom & Dad would take me out for Hallowe’en. They would use the bag of treats for when I had low blood sugars. I don’t recall having them as a random treat.

I don’t recall how old I was but I was under 10 when there came a time my parents figured I would be old enough to keep the bag of Hallowe’en candy in my closet. They told me I could keep it in the closet in my bedroom on condition that I tell them when I felt “funny” so I could dip my urine…yes…dip my urine!! to test to see if I was negative (a possible low). Then I could ‘treat’ with my treats.

I recall trying to have self control but what child under 10 can keep a bag of candy in their closet & not eat it at will? I understand why my parents did what they did, they wanted to try and incorporate some normalcy for me. They felt by doing this it would help me feel included in choice.

What happened? Each day when everyone was busy I would sneak candy. How did I get caught? My Dad was an avid runner. He always chewed gum when he ran. One day he went to go out for a run and realized he was out of gum. He came to me and asked to take some gum from my Hallowe’en bag. I still remember the panic. I felt horrified. The bag was full of wrappers but nothing else.

Little did I know that my Mom had been perplexed for weeks wondering why my urine was dipping positive for high sugar. After trying to avoid my Dad from going into my closet to get my bag of stash that no longer existed I knew the jinx was up.

I stood there with a full body panic as Dad looked into my bag. Dad was pretty cool. I do believe in that moment in time he knew that him & Mom shouldn’t have allowed this to happen. It was explained to me the implications of what happened to my sugars as a result of my choices. Mom was relieved because now she knew why!! Two very important lessons I learned and interestingly will never forget.

What happened with subsequent Hallowe’ens? It was actually pretty cool! Mom, Dad & I with my little sister & brother would go through our stash as most do. When we did, Mom, Dad & I would negotiate the price of my stash. It was a game. With that money I was allowed to go shopping for my own treats. Off to the local convenience store I would with my $1-$2 and go buy whatever sugar free treats that were offered.

I don’t feel like I missed out. Not once.

Stay tuned for Part 2.

Change or Transition?

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Change or Transition?

The words spill across the physicians desk or the hospital bed “You have diabetes.” or harder yet “Your child has diabetes.” Your head spins trying to absorb what that means. Depending on what your knowledge or experiences are, thoughts, emotions and response after this moment can vary dramatically. What you do know is that from that moment on your life has changed forever. Forever. Changed. Where do you go from here?

At this point I challenge you to substitute the word change for transition. Change is defined as an act or process through which something becomes different. Yes, this is true when receiving the diagnosis of diabetes. Something has become different. Transition is defined as the process or a period of changing from one state or condition to another. Do you see the difference between change and transition?

The picture you see is of the Peterborough Liftlock. It was recently taken on a beautiful Fall day on one of our weekend walks. Wikipedia provides a great summary of the greatness of this world renown landmark.

“The Peterborough Lift Lock is a boat lift located on the Trent Canal in the city of Peterborough, Ontario, Canada, and is Lock 21 on the Trent-Severn Waterway.
The dual lifts are the highest hydraulic boat lifts in the world, with a lift of 19.8 m (65 ft). This was a considerable accomplishment at the time when conventional locks usually only had a 2 m (7 ft) rise. It is not the highest boat lift of any type in the world today: the lift at Strépy-Thieu in Belgium has a greater capacity (1,350 tonnes) and height difference (73.15 m)…Many local residents of Peterborough skate on the canal below the lift lock in the winter.
The Peterborough Lift Lock was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 1979,[1][2] and was named an Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1987.[3]”

Picture yourself sitting in a boat on the canal at the top of this lock. You will have to trust me at this point but the view from the top is amazing. Add the transition of colour on the leaves on the trees. It is breathtaking. I say the leaves are transitioning because we know that eventually those leaves will fall off and the tree will become bare. The tree is on a journey with an evolving objective. At this point it’s goal is to shed its existing facade so it can rest for the winter to produce buds and beautiful bright green leaves in the Spring.

Back to the locks…It is understood when you approach the lock that eventually you will transition to the water below and your journey will continue on. Whether you have a plan as to where you to go from that point can amplify the quality of the experience when you arrive at the bottom of the lock. Most would agree that a plan needs to be made in order for the next phase of the journey to be enjoyable and memorable. Without a plan to transition to the next location, all could be lost stressing out on what to do next rather then taking pleasure in the journey.

To be successful living with diabetes one must not be satisfied with just accepting change but beginning the transition to living a life in a different state. There are many steps to achieving this, a plan is essential. If these steps are taken and transition is accepted, not just the understanding and acceptance of change, you can live a full and productive life with diabetes. I encourage you to always plan and be secure in your journey knowing you are transitioning to the next destination in your life with diabetes.

Eden’s Journey

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DBB FB Eden Blog Pic 1

Hey Everyone! My name is Eden, I am 21 years old, a student, a girl trying to lose weight and well a Type 1 Diabetic. I thought I would share my weight loss journey, and all the tips and tricks that I have found helpful. But first a little about me, and my journey to where I am.
I was diagnosed when I was 17 years old with type one diabetes. It does not run in my family, and I was the “lucky” one who got it ha ha. When I was younger I also battled with a disease called Graves disease, which weakened my immune system (luckily I am still in remission), and the doctors believe that this is why I got Diabetes. While staying in the hospital, I realized that I am going to be on my own dealing with this disease. I had horrible hospital staff, uneducated people trying to teach me about Diabetes! One nurse thought I get my insulin after my meals, and another decided to tell my mother who was in a state of panic, that I may go into a coma at any given minute if my sugars were low….needless to say my mother had a breakdown. It was not a great start to say the least, and has continued to be a crappy situation. So ever since I was diagnosed, it’s been me, my body, and well the internet trying to figure this whole thing out!
So I thought I would write a daily blog post about my weight loss journey I am currently on  It is hard for diabetics sometimes because unlike “normal” people, we have to make sure our sugars are constantly ok…no highs or lows, and our heart rate is okay. I hate using the word “normal” but I think you understand what I mean. I am still trying to figure out what works best for my body, but I have learned A LOT throughout my journey thus far. I have always been slightly overweight, but when I was diagnosed I gained almost 35 pounds….I was shocked. All this happened during the month of my prom and graduation. Needless to say…I hated the photos! I was 205 pounds and I felt depressed, and I still battle with these feelings. It took me a long time to start being healthy. During October 2012 I joined a local nutrition program, and I loved it! I did not follow it completely and I did not do a lot of physical exercise, but I still dropped 10 pounds within the first 2 months! I was so happy, and during December and the Christmas dinners….I lost track of my program. It suddenly clicked in me that why am I doing this to myself? My university graduation is around the corner, and I do not want to feel the same way I did in high school! So in January I started to follow the program. It is a bit hard to change how you eat and I am still learning 😛 I go to the gym 4 sometimes 5 days a week (hard with my schedule of 6 courses, work and homework!) But of course I have had a bit of a battle with my sugars which I think I finally “cracked the code” on. Needless to say I am 174 pounds now….31 pounds down from my heaviest! I would like to be around 145-150 pounds for my height (5’6). My graduation is on May 31, 2013 and I am hoping to get to 158-160 by graduation  It is going to be hard, but hopefully you will all support me  I will share photos of myself, and foods I make….I LOVE COOKING! And anything else I find interesting  Hopefully I inspire some of you with my story, and with my future posts  I won’t lie, it is difficult, but it is not as hard if you have someone you can connect with who understands what you are going through  You can follow me on instagram edenalexandriadaly to see my photos day-to-day 
Until Tomorrow!

Never Prepared

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Never Prepared

In all the years the kids were in primary and yes, even high school, I only missed one year of their first day of school. In my mind it was a given I would be there. I had to be there so I could take, what would become, the “First Day of School Picture”. It was very important to me and I felt for them, to be there to tell them to ‘have a good day, be safe, I love you’, giving them hugs and kisses before they got on the bus. The picture I took each year measured many things. Growth, happiness, anticipation, excitement, love, memories, health. I wanted to make sure the kids knew that school was a big deal. It was a positive place to be. Learning at school was as important as at home. This is a pic of Cayla, 9, and Kurtis, 7, in September 2000. Today I showed Kurtis the pic. He tells me he doesn’t like the picture, he thinks he looks like a geek. :p

In this photo, Kurtis is less than 2 months away from the day he was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes.

Not knowing the ‘stats’, from the time my kids were born, I kept an eye on how much they drank, peed and gained weight. It didn’t occur to me to look up the ‘stats’ on being a Type 1 parent and the chances of ‘passing’ it on to my children until after Kurtis’ diagnosis. According to the American Diabetes Association, the stats read like this:

Both parents (neither have Type 1) have inherent risk factors that contribute to a child developing Type 1.

A child with a Dad living with Type 1 has 1 in 17 odds of developing Type 1.

A child with a Mom that had him/her before the age of 25 has a 1 in 25 chance of developing Type 1.

If Mom has her kids after the age of 25, the odds go up to 1 in 100.

A parent diagnosed with Type 1 before the age of 11 provides a risk of double that their child will develop it.

Regardless of the stats, in my gut I knew. I spoke with other parents who live with Type 1 diabetes that have the same worries as me. But is the effect of the diagnosis the same as a parent that has no idea until diagnosis that their child may develop it?

I try to put myself in my parents shoes as neither one of them have Type 1. Now mind you it was 1975, but hear me out. I am imagining myself as a parent living without Type 1 who has a child that is diagnosed with Type 1. The ‘radar’ saying “I will keep an eye out, just in case.” doesn’t exist. When that day comes. When my very sick child is before me and the Doctor tells me that he/she has Type 1, finally, because heaven knows in this modern-day of technology and knowledge it seems the awareness of signs and symptoms among many health care professionals still does not exist. I am told he/she will take injections of insulin to sustain them for the rest of their life. My mind would spin. I envision myself being whisked off to the hospital or clinic with my very sick child where I would be expected to take a crash course on how to keep my child from having lows so severe they could die and highs so high they become very sick with ketones with the risk of developing long-term complications, possibly dying from these complications. I would be expected to learn how to titrate a medication that is life saving but can cause death if not treated with respect. I have to learn how to poke my precious child with a sharp needle not once a day but several times. What are kids most fearful of? Pain. What do glucose tests and needles cause? Pain. What does a parent try to protect their child from at all costs? Pain.

I can’t tell you it was easier for me. If it was, it would be difficult to relate to the feelings of a parent not living with Type 1 prior to their child being diagnosed. I was ‘blessed’ to have more experience and knowledge. That’s all. At the end of the day, I am a parent first.

Kurtis’ ‘road’ to his diagnosis began 2 years earlier. He was 5, the same age when I was diagnosed. On one particular day he seemed to be drinking and peeing more than usual. I don’t know how, as he was my strong willed child, but I convinced him to poke his finger without much fuss. His blood sugar 2 hours after he ate his meal was 8.2 mmol/L (148 mg/dL). My jaw dropped. My stomach flipped. I called the Family Physicians office immediately. The receptionist told me to check his sugar after having him fast 12 hours. Now, I do have to say, this was not funny at the time but as a parent and now that I speak of it, it is. 16 hours later, I finally promised Kurtis I would take him to McDonald’s. I never took my kids to McDonald’s!! I was SO desperate & scared, I promised if he let me poke his finger I would buy him a McHappy Meal. He agreed. It is now 10am!! He must’ve been starving! Kurtis’ sugar was 4.8 mmol/L (86 mg/dl). I called the Physician’s office to report back. I wasn’t convinced that this made it all right. I had that gut feeling a parent gets when they “know” something isn’t right.

Fast forward to September and October 2000. From the time Kurtis was a baby he had a history of ear and sinus infections. He lived with one ear infection after another. From one sinus infection to another. He would finish one round of antibiotics and would be onto the next.

As usual, Kurtis had a healthy summer. On the first day of school, as pictured, he seemed great, looked healthy. Once exposed to the school environment of germs, sneezes and coughs, his health slowly declined to a point I knew he was going to be sick. Dark shadows under the eyes and very pale. I would keep him on a tight schedule of bedtime and keep him fed well with healthy, home cooked meals. It didn’t seem to matter.

But, this time was different. Kurtis had that ‘look’ I was familiar with. I was perplexed, he wasn’t getting sick. At that time, for his age group, track pants were the fad. He was always a big boy. Always in or over the 90th percentile in height and weight for his age. When he had a growth spurt he would get chunky and stretch up. Being 7 years of age, I didn’t weigh him often or become concerned if he thinned out a bit.

October 31, 2000. I had sent Kurtis to school with a plate full of treats for his classes Hallowe’en party. As well as making a point of being there in the morning to put them on the bus, I tried my best to be there to see them come home from school as well. As Cayla and Kurtis walked in the front door, I was excited for them. I looked forward to carving their pumpkins and get dressed up for our night out Trick or Treating. As I prepared and fed the kids their after school snack, in the conversation of asking how their day was, Kurtis’ informs me that he didn’t eat much at his Hallowe’en party because he felt sick to his tummy and peed and drank at the water fountain all day. I wanted to throw up. I knew. I didn’t even have to check him to know. But of course, I did.

After explaining to him my suspicions and what I needed to do to confirm, come hell or high water, Kurtis was not going let me check by finger poke. I did a dipstick of his urine. I wanted to cry. The test strip showed 4+ sugar. It was 4:30pm. I called the Family Physicians office again. In the background I could hear Kurtis crying “I hate diabetes” “I don’t want diabetes”. This time I knew it wasn’t going to be instructions to check his fasting. In my mind at that time, all I could think was, I GAVE my baby diabetes.

I believe my emotions with Kurtis’ diagnosis may be a bit different, but not much then parents who don’t have diabetes. In the end, I have come to terms with the fact, it doesn’t matter. It is what it is. BUT, with that being said, and why I write this post is that there are two things I learned that I want to pass onto you. Whether you are a parent that has ‘passed’ on Type 1 to your child or parents that carry those dreaded inherent genes that we know little about ….

1. I cried to my Mom many times about the fact I ‘gave’ Kurtis diabetes. I felt SO guilty!! Being the amazing Mom she is, do you know what she asked me? “So, if you were to chose whether you had Kurtis or he had diabetes, which would it be?” OH MY!! There is no choice! I would have him a thousand times over!!

2. A year later of Kurtis & I grieving (separately mind you, he never saw me grieve) he would sit on the couch trying to inject himself (he insisted) for a minimum of an hour morning and night. I would listen to him cry and wail about how much it hurt and he can’t do it and he hates diabetes …so painful to watch. I finally realized I was enabling him to be pitied for something he had no control over. I don’t believe in enabling people to be pitied. I then realized I needed to empower him. I told him he had no choice. I told him it sucked living with diabetes BUT he could do whatever he wanted to do! I asked him if he saw me wailing and crying over taking my needles? Did he see me feeling sorry for myself? I told him I would no longer tolerate pity. He could share his feelings but could not use his diabetes for pity.

Our human compassion binds us the one to the other – not in pity or patronizingly, but as human beings who have learnt how to turn our common suffering into hope for the future. Nelson Mandela

Yesterday and Today

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Yesterday and Today

In 1975, I was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes after months of my Mom telling our family doctor something was really wrong.

He insisted it was a cold & I would recover in time.

Finally, after several months of symptoms such as wetting the bed at night (after having been toilet trained for years), having to pee before we got to the end of the driveway for a walk, weight loss (my Mom says my ribs stuck out, she thought when she picked me up she would break them), extreme thirst & sitting on the toilet crying because it burned so bad when I peed, my Mom felt relieved as she thought she knew what was wrong…. I had a bladder infection.

After the refusal of our family Doctor to see me anymore and upon the firm insistence of my parents, I was finally seen by another Doctor. When they dipped my urine for an infection, instead, they found large amounts of ketones. I was rushed to the hospital. I was also diagnosed with Whooping Cough. I was hospitalized for 10 days. Back then my Mom couldn’t stay with me overnight. I still remember that stay. It was very traumatic. I missed my Mom so much. I hated when she left each night.

I was just weeks shy of my 6th Birthday & weighed a mere 31 lbs (14 kg). I was started on 1 injection in the morning of Lente & Toronto insulin. Both insulins were unpredictable. The needle length went into my muscle instead of my subcutaneous tissue making the unpredictability worse, but there was no one then who was aware that a 13mm needle was too long for anyone, big or small. My Mom tested my sugars by urine through a dipstick. The goal was to have a dipstick with Trace sugar & no ketones. I did not receive my first glucose meter until I was 11 based on the cost which was about $200.

Based on my diagnosis, experiences, changes & the management I have experienced throughout the years, I am thankful for so many things:

1. My parents were told I would never have children. Although at the time I announced my pregnancies there was a lot of worry, I successfully have had two pregnancies (although very challenging) & two beautiful children.

2. I am blessed to have no complications after 37 years, which is rare.

3. I am living in a time where the technology advances in managing diabetes are becoming available faster then we can acquire them but provides the opportunity to get access to & manage it better.

4. We seem to be closer to a technology that allows for less management on our part & the reliance on bio feedback mechanisms that will reliably do most of the work for us.

5. Pharmaceutical companies that create, manufacture & produce insulin, such as Novo Nordisk Inc., are creating programs which offer easier access to children living with Type 1 diabetes living in developing countries that otherwise would not have it and risk dying due to affordability & access. Much still needs to be done about this (one of my passions) but the movement by corporate has started to fill this huge gap.

6. The choices and dissemination of media communication and access is the forum for supporting curiosity, access, acquisition of knowledge and action with regards to living with diabetes. This is essential to empower people living with such a complex disease.

7. I have been blessed to be part of a network with many gifts, experiences & an education that enables me to practically & clinically share with each of you, no matter where you live, what is needed to live with Diabetes Beyond Borders.

For most diagno…

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For most diagnoses all that is needed is an ounce of knowledge, an ounce of intelligence, and a pound of thoroughness. – Anonymous

In January, for the second time in two months I arrive in the Emergency Department.  

I have to be in pretty rough shape to go there.  I can count on one hand how often I have gone for myself.  Having worked in the ER, I have seen people’s definition of what an emergency is.   I don’t want to be one of those people.  But, here I am doubled over in pain again.  Just before heading out the door, I stand with my hands shaking, heart pounding, crying…Googling my symptoms one more time, trying to find a diagnosis that I can fix so I don’t have to go.  Then I think to myself…what if I am dying of something and they can treat it?  That would be really stupid!

So off I go.  The Triage Nurse asks what’s happening.  I tell her.  She takes my history.  Takes my blood pressure.  WHOA!!  I guess I am in pain….155/100.  Ok, I feel a little more justified in being there.  They take me right in.  Ok, I’m feeling even more justified.  

The ER Doctor comes into assess me and has already looked up my health history from the past 10 years! That’s a first!!  I describe to him what I have and am presently experiencing.  I tell him my thoughts about it.  I tell him the tests I have had.  He urgently orders a shot of pain medication in my hip.  The nurse comes in and tells me that it will sting a bit as it is going in.  As she injects it, I comment to her that it doesn’t really hurt.  THEN, she pulls the needle out and man, oh, man…talk about a delayed reaction!!  The burn!  But, if it was going to take the pain away, the burn was the least of my discomfort.

The thorough assessment by the Doc gave me some reassurance that this time there would be a diagnosis.  Although I had an Ultrasound and a CT Scan from my earlier ER visit, which showed nothing, the Dr insists I should have another CT Scan.  In my mind, I am thinking MRI! MRI!  But I figure I will humour him.  

Finally the pain med begins to take the edge off.  During the Ultrasound, the Tech is taking the probe across one spot in particular, over and over.  Let me tell you, that was fun…NOT!  A necessary evil.  Finally, she asks if I have a had a different type of Ultrasound.  I have not and feel a sense of relief that she is deciding to do this.  Afterwards, she informs me the ER Dr will talk with us about the results when we go back to Emerg.  She sends us on our way.

Back in the ER, it takes the Dr a bit of time before he comes to speak with us.  I am terrified. Is it, he still doesn’t know or something very serious?

He tells us he has spoken with a Specialist and tells me I have a condition called Adenomyosis.  OK!  I have an answer.  I have a condition.  BUT, what is it, I ask.  He says he doesn’t know, he has never heard of it.  Huh?!?  So is it treatable?  Is it something I have to live with the rest of my life, because pain and diabetes management don’t go well together.  Is it terminal?  He tells us the Specialist wants to see me in a week to discuss treatment options.  In the meantime, he sends me home on Tylenol #3’s and prescription NSAID’s.

I whip out my phone and go to Google.  I guess the Dr doesn’t have Google or a Medical Dictionary at the hospital (insert sarcasm).

After reading about it, a wave of relief washes over me.  I know what the discussion will be with the Specialist now!  It is treatable.  I will need major surgery.  I am excited.  Really, I am!

After researching more, I realize the many issues I am having with my body the past many years, I now know are directly linked to this one condition.  The surgery will fix these things!  

In less then a month I am looking forward to beginning the recovery process.  In the meantime, I have focused on eating well, taking my vitamins and supplements, keeping my blood sugars tight, getting enough sleep and walking.  Ideally, I would like to exercise more intensely to strengthen my muscles but I am not well enough for that.  I remind myself in a few months I will be able to.   I have been reassured by a few friends who have had the surgery that I will wake up one day on week six of the recovery and realize how great I feel, how rough I’ve felt these years.  The countdown is on.

I am looking forward to my new life.

“The secret of …

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“The secret of your future is hidden in your daily routine.” – Mike Murdock

In today’s society we are encouraged to break out, be stimulated, think outside the box.  We are told the less routine we adhere to the more abundant our life will become.  Becoming comfortable is to lose the opportunity to become a better person, to grow and expand our mind and soul.

In many aspects, breaking routine is without doubt a great thing.  Spontaneity can break one out of the doldrums, keep the mind sharp and create excitement.  

With respect to living with diabetes, having routine is essential.  It is proven that testing your blood sugars, taking your medications and insulin injections at the same time each day will increase your chances of success.  

To take it further, creating a routine with regards to healthy eating, meal and snack times is also of great benefit.  By pairing your medication or insulin routine with your meals and snacks, you will notice an increase in well being…once you are settled into your routine, ironing out the wrinkles.  After all, we are very personal in our diabetes.  Although we live with the same diagnosis, we are all unique in how we adapt to certain routines.

One last commitment which needs to be incorporated as part of your daily diabetes routine is physical activity.  The benefits of physical activity are as great as adhering to a routine with your medication, insulin and eating.  

The Centre of Disease Control cites the following as benefits to physical activity: 

By creating and committing to a routine, I hope this will enable you to live life with Diabetes Beyond Borders.