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Loss of Control – How Do We Regain It

I urge you to read the link I have attached.  Although it is from the Canadian Diabetes Association, I have read many links which involve Diabetes Associations that exist around the globe.  It seems on paper the protocol is in place if the school board or district is agreeable to implement & support.  Every parent past & present that has a child with Type 1 fight to keep their child safe at school.  The fact that our children are not viewed as ‘in need’ of special care in their daily management of diabetes at school is preposterous.  Every diabetes organization is posting guidelines & lobbying for change but it is happening too slow.  While school boards fight to keep their budgets or manage with less, our children living with diabetes’ risks of adverse events occurring is higher.

Examples to support the lack of guidelines & the situations Kurtis met as a result:

1.  In Grade 5 his class is in a portable.  Soon after the school year starts, Kurtis comes home to tell me during class that day he feels like he is having a low blood sugar.  He tells his teacher.  He tests & confirms.  The teacher sends him by himself out from the portable into the school to the office to get a juice box.  He tells me he is scared.  Two issues:  there are juice boxes in the classroom AND most important, she sends my scared son BY HIMSELF outside to enter the school & walk up a long hall & a set of stairs to treat himself for a low blood sugar.  What if he didn’t make it?

2.  In this same class, it is the middle of winter.  A similar event occurs.

3.  I discuss with the teacher the concern.  She explains she can not expect a student to go with him as they need to be in the class to learn.  She offers she can not leave the class to go with him & leave them on their own.

4.  I discuss my concerns with the principal.  She meets with the teacher & enforces a student needs to go with Kurtis when going to the office for a low…IF….there are NO juice boxes in the classroom.

5.  At one point, Kurtis has a severe low at school.  I meet with the principal & discuss options of having Glucagon for treatment if he becomes unable to take treatment orally.  She informs me the school board will not allow her or the staff to inject Glucagon.  I ask if children that have severe anaphylaxis to bee’s & peanuts have Epi-Pen’s at school?  She says “yes”.  I ask if the staff are allowed to inject the Epi-Pen if such an event occurs. She says “yes”.  I point out to her that both events need life saving injection of a drug.  She counters that she can call an ambulance with Kurtis & by the time they get to the school he will be okay.  I was furious.  How do you educate someone who is such an imbecile?  So stuck on the rules that they won’t consider a child’s life could be at jeopardy?

How did I deal with this?  I made myself on-call regardless whether I was sleeping from a night shift.  If I was working a 12-hour day, I was fortunate my parents were on stand-by.  I made it clear that the school was not to call 911 first (as the school was in the country), they call me.  I knew I could make it to the school quicker than the ambulance could.

Thankfully, with regards to his diabetes, nothing serious happened.

I am not sure how to make an impact to sway school boards to start a standardized protocol that allows for a budget for help in overseeing glucose testing, injecting & bolus of insulin, eating the correct food & bringing attention to the proper person the needs of a child with Type 1.  I do suggest lobbying & pressure by our local diabetes associations as well as supporting them in their campaign is instrumental.  Many voices are louder than one.  I urge you to take part.

How to Prove You’re Cool with Diabetes

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How to Prove You're Cool with Diabetes

“Did you make any friends?”

After the first day of Kindergarten or starting a new school there are many questions to ask. The answers are usually pretty straight forward. Kids usually come home from school telling of events that occurred with their friends. Some days it is the story of “So and so is not my friend anymore, they did this to me…” or “Look at the picture so and so made for me.” or “So and so gave me their cookies and I traded them my chocolate milk.”

Children are compassionate and caring. They are resilient. Children are honest but also cruel.

As a Mom, I was witness to a mob mentality with a group of Grade 4 boys.

As I mentioned in my blog yesterday, after speaking with the children in Kurtis’ class, it seemed some of the kids would play with him. He now had a small group of friends. Once they knew they couldn’t get diabetes by touching him, they were okay with playing with him.

In October of his Grade 4 year I started Kurtis on an insulin pump. Thankfully his teacher was incredible. She was a classmate of mine from primary and high school. She was very proactive in Kurtis’ care and the learning curve associated with learning how to pump. At that time I worked part-time in the hospital as a nurse in the Intensive Care Unit. The teacher knew she could call me at work or home for questions or concerns. The calls initially were frequent.

Upon starting Kurtis on his pump, I opted to start him on an angled teflon infusion set. I tried a straight-in set but they kept bending causing sudden, extreme highs. I felt the angled set would give us more consistent results. The introducer needle was large enough, depending on where it was inserted, it could be quite uncomfortable. I put EMLA cream on his site one hour before inserting so he wasn’t feeling the discomfort. It worked beautifully.

One afternoon I received a call from his teacher. She sounded excited. She wanted to tell me that Kurtis’ infusion set had ripped out during recess. She was so proud of him. There was no EMLA cream in his kit. Kurtis decided he would insert the Silhouette without it. Mrs. Sperry was awesome. Instead of sending him down to the office or nursing station to change it, she would over see the change. The class was curious to watch.

At this point, the ‘cool’ boys were not as interested in playing with him. This bothered Kurtis. He wanted to play the sport games they played at recess. He didn’t want to just walk around the yard, he wanted to be active. I told him although I understood his need. I also encouraged him to start his own games in the yard, but he wanted to play with the athletic, cool boys.

During the phone call I was told that the kids were so impressed with what Kurtis had done. They talked about it all afternoon. Kurtis had put a really big needle in his stomach. He was SO brave.

Not one Certificate of Achievement could ever make Kurtis feel as proud and accomplished as that day. Days and weeks later, the Grade 4 ‘cool’ boys began to invite him to play at recess. The icing on the cake for Kurtis.

As a parent I had mixed feelings. To me it was a form of intimidation. A child having to go through a form of initiation to be friends with children so he could gain the acceptance and confidence he needed to feel good at school. I understand this happens with all children to some degree, with or without diabetes. I have seen it in a milder form with my daughter.

I had to accept that this was part of learning and life with diabetes. Since those days of Grade 3 and 4, I have hoped and prayed that Kurtis would learn that he should never have to prove himself to anyone because he lives with diabetes. It’s hard to convey that to a child, especially when they feel isolated from their peers because of it. As with many things our children experience, we can teach and guide them, but sometimes they just have to touch the stove to understand it’s hot.

Tomorrow my blog will be on the situations and concerns about Kurtis’ safety with his diabetes at school.

You Can Get Diabetes By Touching Someone

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DBB FB Blog Catch Diabetes Touching

Our family moved in 2001. As a result of the move the kids transferred to a new school. Kurtis was living with diabetes for just under one year. In his previous school the acceptance & understanding of staff & children with his diabetes was great.

Within weeks of his new adventures of being a 3rd Grader in his new school, Kurtis informs me he can’t make friends. “Why?”, I ask. “They point at me and laugh. The kids are telling other kids if they touch me they will get diabetes.”

Within days I receive a phone call from his teacher. She asks if I will come in & speak with the class. She tells me the same story Kurtis has just days before. She wants the class to learn about diabetes.  She is concerned that the misinformation being discussed among his peers will lead to long-term issues.  She is concerned for Kurtis’ well being.   Ms. Maker explains she feels I will make an impact because I live with diabetes as well. They will see me as a Mom who is a nurse, I have friends & I have a daughter that doesn’t have diabetes. I agree & start planning how I will speak to the children about this.

The main myth to displace was reassuring them that Kurtis didn’t get his diabetes from touching me.   My plan was to think like a 7 & 8-year-old.

Word for word I can’t tell you what I said or how I said it.  It was a little less than 12 years ago.  I do remember sitting in a chair with the kids sitting on the floor around me.  They had a lot of questions.  I kept it simple.  Kurtis was pleased & so proud his Mom went in to talk with the kids about his diabetes.  It helped with them being more social with him.  He was not gawked at as much.  But making friends continued to be an issue until Grade 5.

Look for my Blog tomorrow on what happened that caused the children to respect Kurtis and his diabetes.