Attempts at Perfection & It’s Failures

“Have no fear of perfection – you will never achieve it.” – Salvador Dali

I can’t get my head around it.  Does anyone with diabetes who is motivated in their management think they can’t achieve perfection?  Yes I said CAN’T.

As a Person With Diabetes I think that not only can I achieve challenging feats beyond my day to day life, such as ascending the Peruvian Tundra to over 15,000 ft BUT I can also achieve perfection with my diabetes.

As a PWD I know that this mindset is superfluous.  BUT, I still want to pursue it, just in case I can achieve it.  You never know, right??  Isn’t that a great goal to set and pursue. Almost like a cure, really.

BUT….yes, I said BUT…I am reminded of how the attempts of trying to be all that to my endocrine system and diabetes management isn’t that simple. Even after coming into 40 years of living with diabetes and being a Mom of a PWD for 14 years.

I am reminded on our flight to Peru, no matter how hard I attempt to make my diabetes perfect, I cannot.

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Upon take off I am aware of the potential impact the air pressure can have on my insulin pump delivery.  The rule of thumb despite there is not total clinical evidence with regards to this is to disconnect on ascension and descending. Why?  The talk of the town is that upon take off the pressure can change the delivery of insulin to cause a low blood sugar. During the flight the pressure change can create air bubbles resulting in missed insulin after landing.

I have experienced this throughout the past 14 years of travel on an insulin pump but was not aware of the ‘talk’ that circulated about this until the past few years.

So, whether clinically relevant or not, I decide to take heed to try and avoid this.

We are prepared for take off at Pearson.  Status quo.  Prior to boarding I check my Continuous Glucose Sensor.  All is good in my diabetes world.

As the plane positions itself for take off on the runway I disconnect from my site with the intention of reconnecting within a few minutes after the rapid ascension is complete.

I am excited.  I am thinking about our trip, the flight which is 21 hours with stop overs.  In my mind I am running through what we packed versus the list I print and check off.  I am nervous.  I am landing in a city that has an elevation of over 8,000 feet.  I am worried after the stories I am told of elevation sickness.

The airline steward serves our snacks.  I give it to Steve.  Packed full of gluten. I don’t need a snack anyway.  I’m not hungry.  I look at some magazines.  I do a Word Search.

Several hours pass by.  I start to feel like the Sahara desert lives in my mouth. My stomach feels like a brick made a home in it.  My chest feels heavy.

I question these feelings.  Why?  It feels like I am high.  How come?  I don’t clue in to check my sugar though.  I attribute it to the elevation, the dry air, the excitement.

The steward comes around again.  Offers snacks.  I pass mine onto Steve’s again.  Maybe if I eat and drink a ton of water I’ll feel better.  I take one of my gluten free bars out of my bag.  I bolus, I eat. I feel like crap.

Is it the flight?  The cabin pressure?  I just can’t make sense of it.  Obviously my brain cells are not firing on all cylinders.  Doesn’t being on guard all the time with managing diabetes do that to a person?

Then…I get an itch at my site.  And so I scratch. It is so itchy I must lift my shirt enough to place my hand under so I can make skin to skin contact to find satisfaction. While scratching I realize my tubing at my site is flopping back and forth….I am NOT attached to my site.

I forgot to re-connect after take off.  That was 3 hours ago.

In my effort to achieve diabetes management perfection, I fail.

Now, forgiveness is mine. I am so insulin sensitive that I only end up with a BG of 11 mmol/L.  I check for ketones as well.  They measure at only 0.3.  So…I correct for the gluten free bar and basal rates missed as well as a small amount for the trace amount of ketones.  It takes several hours to come down and even though my sugar is only 11, I feel like I’m on the edge of DKA.  I  know what it’s like, I’ve been there.

We land in Peru and I am almost in target.

After that incident I make a promise with myself.  Disconnecting on a flight to achieve perfect blood sugars is not a goal I wish to achieve.  For what I wish to achieve I fail.  I avoid a potential low but instead end up high and feeling terrible.

What’s the lesser of two evils.  I can’t answer that but I will tell you I will no longer disconnect my site.

I’m OKAY!! Really!?

Wedding Cruise5With the exception of the time we dated in high school, my husband Steve is diagnosed with Type 1 spousal diabetes for just under four years.

It may seem silly but I assumed in all this time he knew diabetes like I did.  I can’t even tell you why I thought he would learn 39 years of living with Type 1 diabetes as I have experienced by observing signs, symptoms and random sharing of how I feel in certain situations.  He has never had formal education in the less than 4 years we have been together.

The moment I understood I need to share my life with diabetes more?

We arrived in Lima, Peru.

After settling on the last leg of our journey we decide to head out in search of a few markets and sites for some art pieces.

On the way back, my pump alarms that my sensor is telling me my blood sugars is 4 mmol/L.  My sugar is going down.  Stupidly, I have no sugar on me…Steve is so good he usually does have lifesavers in his pocket…but he has none.

I feel it is lower than 4 mmol/L.  But I am stubborn.  Steve asks if I want him to go into a store and get sugar.  I say it’s OK .

First, when my sugar trends towards low but I feel like I am not in danger, I don’t treat with rapid acting sugar, I set a temporary basal rate.  I think it’s a control thing.  I want to change the stupid system that really works…just to see if I can make it better.  I am so anti-sugar….I really want to take it…mental block.

So…I say to Steve, it’s okay, I’ll set a temp rate.

And we keep walking.

And several minutes later I become dull.  And quiet.  I lack my bubbly, sunshine Type A personality.

Steve knows but doesn’t know.  He hasn’t experienced such an extreme moment like this.

I personify strength.  Knowledge.  Power.  Ability.  I am never the victim.  He trusts that. Even thought his gut tells him different.

DBB Hypo Peru

So he trusts me and my choice.

Until I mumble I want ice cream.  And he asks further questions.  And I am indecisive and vague.

We end up in a grocery store a few blocks away from our hotel.  He asks me several times what I want to get….I don’t know.  In my mind I want to ask him to help me.  Save me from this terrible prison in my mind of wanting to be in control.  Not to ask for help.  I will take care of myself.  I won’t confess I have failed.  I won’t ask.  I refuse.  I won’t.  I have done this since I was a little girl.  My (mis)behaviour trumps my voice.

I am no good to anyone.  I know it.  I am too far gone to say that.

Steve finally suggests and I agree.

We pay out at the cash and I inhale.

Many minutes later Tracy returns.

Later that night we debrief.  He tells me…”I knew, but I didn’t because you know!”, but I did.  And I failed to tell him.  Thankfully he saw it today. Exactly what I just described.

He tells me “…from now when when you say “It’s okay, I’ll set a temporary basal rate.”  I am going to pop into a store and buy some candies.”

And he will tell me.  “You need this candies”.  And I now I will take them.  Regardless of how bad I want to be in control.  Because, we have this consensual contract.

It’s good to share my diabetes.  A liberation.  Enlightening.  It is a relief to give a very small piece of it to someone else.  Even though it is only a very small piece of what my mind thinks of 24-7-365, if feels good. Despite how much control I want.  And how hard it is to let go.

Travelling with My Pharmacy

DBB Huchay Cusco Blog

There will a few posts/Blogs about my travels to and within Peru.

BUT..

I feel this post in particular is a huge one and is pressing upon me to prioritize even though it’s not in order.

We spent Christmas Eve in Agues Calientes. We planned to climb Machu Picchu Christmas Day.

I became very ill with a very high fever and ultimately sinus congestion, sore throat, fatigue among other things.

I am proud of the way the situation turned out as I recovered very quickly compared to most times I experience this. My husband questioned if I should take part in the venture to Machu Picchu but I insisted despite feeling down and out I would not miss such an amazing opportunity. This is a chance in a lifetime!!! And so we did.

With that being said, after we returned to Cusco a few days later we made plans to take part in a two day trek up the Andes mountains, through the Peruvian Tundra. We would then be hosted by a family overnight before descending back down the next day to another town a few hours away from our starting point.

We reach an elevation of 15,100 feet. Understanding that breathing would be a challenge at the best of times, I am overly concerned that with my congestion and swollen throat it would present greater issues.

On our way to the drop off point 1 1/2 hours away by jeep, I ask our guide to stop at a pharmacy to buy cold medication to help keep the symptoms from being too overwhelming throughout the climb.

As I walk into the pharmacy I take note this is the very first lesson I learn.  Never assume I can go away for 2 weeks and be healthy the whole time. I usually pack cold medications, gravol etc for those ‘just in case’ moments.

This is the first time I didn’t take my personal pharmacy with me. Sigh.

Our guide Henry takes me into the pharmacy in Cusco. I tell Henry in English that I need an anti-histamine/anti-inflammatory. I expect something along the lines of Advil Sinus & Cold or Buckley’s.

After the Pharmacist asks Henry a few more questions in Spanish….”Is it altitude sickness?”…”No, I had a very high fever, sore throat and sinus congestion.”…He recommends a product.

I take a ticket to the cash booth/dispensary at the front of the store. She gives me the box of medication. I am so relieved I will have the meds to help with the congestion, I don’t consider that I didn’t tell the pharmacist I have T1 diabetes OR that I took time to read the ingredients.   At this point I don’t make the connection that Dexametasona (in English “Dexamethasone”) is a steroid!!! I mean, come on, I am a Nurse. I should know the 5 R’s!!

AND I can’t buy a steroid over the counter in Canada! For good reason!

I am told to take one pill now (it is 7:30am) and again at supper. I can take it twice a day for a few days.

Within an hour I can feel the relief. I am overjoyed….until…

Fast forward to that evening and into the overnight…AND the next day…my blood sugars begin to climb…and climb…and climb.

I take insulin corrections like drinking water with no change. Not even a flicker in my Continuous Glucose monitor display. My finger pokes confirm all is not right within my diabetes world.

I reflect back on when we arrived in Cusco. Within a day I was setting temporary basal rates on my insulin pump for low blood sugars and now??? I am insulin resistant in the Andes Mountains??

I play scenarios in my mind. Is it the altitude? Is it dehydration? Is it the anaerobic feedback from the intense activity which leads us to experiencing burning leg muscles, shortness of breathe so bad our lungs are burning?

When I work out at the gym and do intense heavy weights my sugars spike. When I do hill training when I run I get the same effect. Is this the same?

At this point I haven’t made the connection yet that the cold meds contain steroids.

I do think that in part, the intensity of the climb did cause an adrenalin surge that did cause my need for more insulin….pair it with an exogenous steroid in my cold meds and here is a recipe for blood sugar disaster.

My key take away?

Bring my own cold meds and pharmacy.

If ever in an emergency that I require medications while in another country, make sure to tell them I have diabetes.

If and when I decide to ascend to 15,100 feet (or higher), take note and act that if it feels anaerobic, increase my insulin rates to accommodate to it.

No doubt it is a tough balance to achieve but I wouldn’t want to throw my hands in the air and not keep playing the game. Next time I want to improve on this experience. I accept my sugars will never be perfect in these situations especially, but, I will do my best.DBB Dexalor

Reassurances

I am dedicating this to my friend Dee who has concerns that she will develop the mindset of an ‘old Diabetic’.  This mindset consists of being scared to death that having short-term high blood sugars will cause amputation, heart disease, kidney disease and stroke.

As a result of these fears, in the past many ‘old Diabetics’ learned to avoid high blood sugars, purposely running very tight sugars on old insulin such as Lente®, Humulin® L, NPH, Humulin® N, Toronto® and Humulin® R.  As a result the experiences of multiple moderate to severe low blood sugars occurred daily and weekly.  ‘Old Diabetics’ were not taught the mindset that a severe low could kill them or cause damage as well.  I know this all to well because I am one of ‘those’ ‘old Diabetics’.  Sadly, today many still live life like this despite the new technologies and choices we have to manage our diabetes.

I am not supporting anything more than the targets set for you or the A1C you need to achieve to attain a healthy life, but I do believe achieving these go beyond numbers and are associated with the mindset of getting there.

Whether you are an ‘old Diabetic’ or not, being diagnosed and living with diabetes can be empowering AND daunting.  You change your lifestyle to live healthier, a big bonus!  After feeling good about your accomplishments you suddenly experience a setback.  So frustrating!

Do you recall this picture?  Do you see an old hag or a young woman?  Can you change your perception of what you initially see?  It is so hard!

Old hag or young woman

 

It is the same with our diabetes.  What do we see when we look at our lives with diabetes?  How do we change our perception?

Reassurances

Is this picture of a lane a challenge that may be snowy and slippery leading to the unknown, possibly a struggle to walk back up, heart beating fast, muscles burning?  Oh the worry over what could be a beautiful journey if the perception is changed.  Or do you see the pleasure of an enjoyable walk with relaxing views including a beautiful winter blue sky in the horizon?  Do you see it?

How can I reassure you that you can manage your diabetes and avoid the things you fear?  Honestly, I can’t.

What I can reassure you is; YOU are not bad.  You are you as a person first who lives with a chronic disease called diabetes.  Don’t connect the two as to who you are and your accomplishments as a person.

You are not your sugars.  You are not your diabetes.  When I hear the statement “I’ve been bad.”, the next words out of my mouth are; “Hey, do you have diabetes???”.  We both laugh and I say, “That’s why you have high and low blood sugars!, HEY, You have diabetes!!”

So how can I reassure you?  I have changed my view of being an ‘old Diabetic’.

I see the picture differently now.  Do you know why?  Living with diabetes isn’t just about me.  What I understand now is that if I choose to not ‘play the game’.  If I choose to not adhere to the rules, if I choose to keep my perspective as an ‘old Diabetic’ and not learn a new perspective, I am not the only one I am hurting.

Who saves me or helps when I decide to run too tight and too low?  Who is SO scared that they may lose me because I was afraid of a short term high or got crazy keeping my sugars too tight?  It’s not me!

Reassurances

ReassurancesI have given my heart and soul raising my 2 beautiful children into young adulthood, I want to continue doing that.  In particular to my son Kurtis as he begins his life living with diabetes independently.

I want to live life. I want grow old with Steve and be able to fully enjoy our journey together.  I don’t him to worry about me.  He has to deal with my choices I make with my diabetes now and in the future.

 

So, with this, these are my reassurances to you:

You can live with diabetes.

You will change your perspective each day on how that will happen.

Through trial and error you will find your groove.

Do not fear the unknown.  Work with what you have today and change your game plan and perspective as need be.  BUT stick to the rules.

You are not bad no matter what the numbers say, the only change you need to make when you see them is to make it better, for your sake and for those you love.

Making Diabetes Sexy

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Making Diabetes Sexy

Pictured is my “Keeping Diabetes Sexy” bag. If you saw it in my purse you would think it was a make-up bag. It’s pink, it’s pretty, it’s girly, it’s sexy. It has character & looks glamorous. But, that is not the sexiest part of this bag, what is? The contents contained within.

Inside is a back up infusion set, tubing, cartridge, Tegaderm, AAA battery, pen tip, lancet, 1/2 unit pen with rapid acting insulin, test strips, Dex 4 gel, SweetTarts (in it’s own sexy container), ketone meter, ketone strips, BG meter & gum. GUM?!? Yep. What’s the one thing that is so not sexy when you have a high sugar??? Bad breathe!!

So why are these items that are products to support my diabetes in a time of high or low blood sugars sexy? Let me convince you they are by telling you what is not…

1. In 1995 I worked full time at a daycare. Driving home from work I realized that I was going low. All I had with me was a really ripe banana. Cayla & Kurtis were in the car with me. I managed to eat the banana & arrived at a convenience store only to discover I had no money on me. At that time there was no debit, no cell phone. I decided I could make the 15 minute drive home to get the juice I so badly needed. I don’t remember driving home. I could’ve killed my children, someone else or left my children without their Mom.

2. Just this past November we attended a Christmas dinner. We stayed overnight. About 2am I woke feeling very, very sick to my stomach. I tossed & turned until I realized I should run to the bathroom. I didn’t make it. From that time until about 8am I continued to vomit violently. My muscles ached, I couldn’t shake it. My BG’s were between 12-15 mmol/L. I determined they were high because of the stress of vomiting. I thought for sure I had food poisoning as the salmon I ate dinner was a bit ‘funny’. I continued to correct & at one point did see my BG drop to 8 mmol/L. Finally at 8am when I was struggling to breath, my chest felt so heavy, every breathe I took burning like acid, I turned to my fiancé & asked him to take me to the hospital, something was really wrong. It was at that moment I picked up my pump to correct a high one more time & realized I could feel the wet insulin coming through the tubing at the connection of the cartridge. It was only then I realized I was in DKA. Thankfully I had an extra site change, tubing & cartridge with me. I changed it up & took a sufficient bolus to avoid hospitalization. I reversed the DKA fairly quickly on my own. I had no ketone meter & no ketone strips to test & avoid this. So not sexy…my fiancé cleaning up after me every time I threw up not knowing what else to do.

What’s else makes our diabetes look unattractive?

1. Having a low & asking someone for something… anything… because we didn’t have our sexy bag.

2. Running out of test strips & ‘guessing’ BG’s only to find out they were out of target & resulted in being sensitive to someone that was unnecessary…or thinking you’re low when you’re high, treating & ending up being really high…because we didn’t have our sexy bag.

3. Being stressed because the infusion set tore out & now acutely making a Plan B to get insulin by injection or an infusion site….because we didn’t have our sexy bag.

4. Having the insulin pump run out of insulin & no access to any for several hours…by the time you get to some you are very high, feel sick & really, really crappy…ugh!! Not sexy!

5. Having the lancet device in your ‘poker’ bend (believe me it’s happened!!) & have no way to check for a full day because there isn’t a sexy bag with a back up…refer back to #2.

6. Having your infusion sweat off to the point of you having to hold in place for hours because the ‘sticky’ stuff is no longer working or accidentally ripping a stainless infusion set out when taking off your shirt to put on a gown for an x-ray. Sexy is having a Tegaderm & infusion site to to stick it down or replace it.

All these events don’t sound so attractive do they?…quite frankly, if you stood back & watched someone have these things happen AND they had pulled out their “Keeping Diabetes Sexy” bag you would’ve thought to yourself…wow, that person has it together, even living with a 24-7-365 disease…that’s attractive!! AND…what is so good looking & sexy about a plain old blue or black case that stores your pens, meter & pump stuff?? Dress them up, make them yours!!

SO….go shopping!! Have fun picking out a bag that says who you are. Fill it up! It’s time for you to own “_____________(insert your name) Keeping Diabetes Sexy” bag….it’s time to make your diabetes sexy!!

To Pump or Not To Pump

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To Pump or Not To Pump

I have some great questions about Insulin Pumps today.

At this point, I will now take a moment and apologize because I have pumped for 12 years & have the benefits of being covered for insulin pump therapy throughout this time, I assume everyone knows what I know about them. I also assume, if they have the ability to, they would automatically want to be on one. That is very ignorant of me and I’m sorry. I started Diabetes Beyond Borders for this very reason, to educate and give as much information to empower you. Unfortunately I missed the mark on this one.

One more small disclaimer. I worked as a Territory Manager for Medtronic Inc. selling Paradigm Insulin Pumps. This Blog will not sell one pump over another. At this point I am now doing Insulin Pump starts & follow-up for Medtronic and Accu-Chek. As a Health Care Professional, peep living with Type 1 & Mom of a Type 1, my aim now is to give you an unbiased summary about Insulin Pump Therapy so that you can research more to see if pumping is right for you & which one best suits your lifestyle & needs if you decide to.

So…here we go….

SIZE: In general, all pumps are bigger then a pager but smaller than a cell phone. Many people have mistaken mine for a pager or cell. In the picture in my hand is one of the smaller ones. I don’t need a lot of insulin, so I use a smaller pump.

COLOURS: You want colour it, you got it. There is charcoal, clear (like mine), pink, green, purple… You can buy covers & skins to decorate it anyway you see fit. I like the clear one because I wear mine in my bra a lot…I don’t want it to be seen through my shirt. A lot of guys like charcoal because it looks more like a pager.

PARTS OF THE PUMP 101:

1. BUTTONS: Used to navigate the pump.  About 5 buttons on the face/front of it, some pumps have ~1 or 2 on the side as well.

2. REMOTE:  Some pumps have remotes that work also as the glucose meter. Not all have this.

3. CARTRIDGE: Fits in the pump which has Rapid Acting insulin such as NovoRapid, NovoLog, Humalog, Apidra (when on a pump you no longer take Long Acting insulin such as NPH, Levemir or Lantus). The cartridge is plastic.

4. TUBING:  It is attached to the cartridge of insulin which comes in various lengths, as short as 18″ to as long as 43″ & a few lengths in between. The tubing is flexible & durable. There is a new ‘patch’ pump on the market that does not have tubing.

5. INFUSION SET: This is the teflon tube or needle that sits under your skin to deliver the Rapid Acting insulin. The tubing connects to the infusion set. It can be connected & disconnected as needed for showering, activity,or intimate moments. There are a variety of infusion sets to choose so that you have the right one for your lifestyle.

BASIC FUNCTIONS OF THE PUMP:

1. BASAL RATE: I call this the ‘base’ or ‘fasting’ delivery of insulin that your pancreas would be doing for you if you didn’t have diabetes. The Long Acting insulin you are taking tries to do this through 1 or 2 injections per day. On the pump, you can customize your basal rate to meet the different needs your body has throughout the day. You can make these changes on an hourly basis if needed. Most people only need 3 − 5 different basal rates during a 24 hour period. They do not change often after they have been established. BUT, the beauty is, you can change them and the time of day you need to. Basal rates are delivered in very small increments throughout the day, each pump delivers the rate based on its own calculation in which that company feels is best for their product but at the end of the day, the delivery is balanced & tiny enough it provides better balance when you are not eating. It is easier to skip a meal or get off schedule without suffering the consequences of a low blood sugar because of the features of a basal rate.

2. BOLUS: Essentially it is the Rapid Acting insulin you inject with. The beauty? The tube is already under your skin so you don’t have to inject. The other benefit is the pump does all the work to calculate your insulin dose. The increments that can be delivered on a pump can be as small as 0.025 units and as big as 35 units. I imagine now your routine on injections involves adding up your carbs, trying to decide how much extra to adjust for a high or low BG, taking a calculator or phone & crunching the numbers to find how much you will inject with your pen or syringe, which usually has to be rounded up or down to the nearest half or full unit of insulin. The built-in bolus calculator allows you to input your BG (usually remotely through the glucose meter), input your carbohydrates. The pump then shows you the breakdown of why it has decided you need a certain amount of insulin. It considers a correction for your sugar to bring it to target, whether that means adding extra to treat a high or subtracting some off to avoid a low. It also shows the carbs you chose & how much insulin you will get based on that. It also takes into consideration how much insulin you still have in your body. Having bad lows from unaccounted insulin still floating around in your body will be no more. The pump remembers.

3. BG READINGS: The pump stores your readings if you enter them into it, whether manually or through your remote meter.

4. CARBS: The pump keeps a history of the carbs you have eaten, when & how much insulin.

5. INCREMENTS: The increments on the basal rate & bolus can be as small or as large as needed. Some pumps vary, so make sure the one you choose fits your needs. Type 1 & Type 2 peeps do very well on pumps for this reason.

6. DELIVERY: The rate a pump delivers insulin varies from pump to pump. Be aware how comfortable you are with the rate it infuses into you.

7. SENSOR: There are only 2 companies that I am aware that offer Continuous Glucose Sensor technology; Medtronic & DexCom. I will post another Blog about this technology. It is far too complex to include it in this one. Suffice to say, having used the technology personally, I see the impact it has on diabetes management & glycemic control.

RESPONSIBILITIES AS A PUMPER:

1. BG TESTING: At least 4 times per day and more often as necessary.

2. INFUSION SET/CARTRIDGE CHANGE: Infusion sets need to be changed every 2 − 3 days, depending on the set you choose. Some companies are saying to change the cartridge & tubing every 3 days, others support 6 is the way to go.

3. DIABETES KETO-ACIDOSIS PROTOCOL: With only having Rapid Acting insulin in your body, it is only in a matter of hours that you will ‘run out’ of insulin in your body if something doesn’t work with your pump. It is easy to trouble shoot & correction can be quick. The trick is to be acutely aware when you test high & adhere strictly to protocol to treat the high sugar. It is rare it can happen but when it does it is SO important to follow the few simple steps it takes to correct it.

WHERE TO WEAR THE PUMP

There is an assortment of clips, pouches & belts that are available from pump companies & online stores. This allows you to decide whether you want it under your pants on your calf, under your skirt around your thigh, clipped on your belt or around your waist, in your bra, around your arm. Creativity, convenience & comfort are key. I know many with  careers from police officers, construction workers, nurses, teachers etc that find living with their insulin pump provides better quality of life for them. It is trial and error of where to place it at first, but once you get your groove, it’s a no-brainer. You’ll forget it’s there.

PROS OF A PUMP:

1. Less low sugars
2. Less variability
3. More flexibility with lifestyle & scheduling
4. Less needles
5. Ability to pro actively prevent low & high sugars with activities, exercise, work etc.
6. Less calculating

CONS OF A PUMP:

1. Have something attached to you 24-7
2. Remembering to change the infusion site, tubing & cartridge on time. (I developed a system to help me remember, some pumps have a reminder in it)

WHAT TO CONSIDER WHEN BUYING A PUMP

1. Ease of Use
2. Technology available that suits your needs
3. Software available to download the results to manage your diabetes
4. Cartridge size (they come in 1.8 mL, 3.0 mL, 3.15 mL)
5. Insurance Coverage
6. Long term costs
7. Pump Company Customer Support
8. Ease of ordering supplies
9. Features within the pump that meet your needs
10. Basal & Bolus delivery increments that meet your insulin needs
11. Infusion set choice (one pump company’s sets are proprietary so you will need to order their supplies only, make sure they have what you want)
12. Some companies require you replace your battery cap & cartridge cap every 3 months. It will be at a cost to you. Make sure to ask about this.
13. Some pumps are waterproof & some are water tight. I have always put it this way…I wouldn’t swim with my cell so why would I swim with my $7,000 pump. Especially in a lake…if it goes to the bottom of the lake there is no getting it back.

I liken deciding to pump & choosing one to buying a car. It’s a long-term, expensive decision you will live with for 4 − 5 years. Shop wisely & make sure to ask a lot of questions. If you have the option to trial one using saline in the cartridge before buying, I urge you to do it.

Always keep in mind:

1. All companies give a 4 year warranty.
2. You have 90 days after you order your pump to return it. If you decide it’s not the right one & you want a different one OR if pumping just isn’t for you. There is no cost to you to return it.
3. Please, please make sure to add your pump to your house insurance policy. If your pump is stolen (which I know people it has happened to!), you want the reassurance you can get it replaced.

You can email me at tracy@diabetesbeyondborders.com with any questions. I am here for you.

As Exciting As the Discovery of Insulin!

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As Exciting As the Discovery of Insulin!

In 1983 and for the next 10 years, researchers began to study whether intensifying diabetes management among people living with Type 1 made a difference. Up to this point there had not been long term research to provide data to prove this to institute change.

When I was diagnosed in 1975, I started on one injection of NPH and Toronto in the morning.  A Keto-Diastix before & after school & at bedtime was dipped in a urine sample to determine sugar & ketones. Little did we know that it was not an accurate test of glucose control. Every 3 months my blood work was done & thankfully my A1C as well. We would see the Paediatrician shortly after.

In 1981, an extra injection of NPH & Toronto was added at supper time. Around that same time I received my first glucose meter.

This study has changed the way people with Type 1 diabetes are managed. It was & still is exciting!

Here is what the Diabetes & Complications Control Trial is about.

There were 1,441 people from Canada & the U.S from 29 centres living with Type 1 diabetes more than 1 year but less than 15 years. They could not take part if they had too many or severe low blood sugars, severe complications or limited life expectancy. The ages studied ranged between 13 and 39. Young children were not studied. There were 2 groups; 1 had their diabetes managed intensively, the others managed as before.

The main goal was to keep blood sugars as normal as possible through a criteria of intense methods for diabetes management.

Clinical findings & significance:

1. The risk of eye complications were reduced 76%.
2. The risk of complications of the kidney were reduced by 50%.
3. The risk of nerve complications were reduced by 60%.
4. By keeping blood sugar’s as normal as possible, the onset & progression of eye, kidney & nerve damage caused by diabetes slowed.
5. Even those who had a history of poor control who sustained any type of BG lowering showed a difference in the progression of complications.
6. For those who already had eye complications by participating in intensive management of their diabetes, they saw the progression of the complication slow by 54%.

What is Intensive Management?

1. Testing BG 4 or more times a day.
2. Injecting insulin at least 3 times per day or using an insulin pump.
3. Following a diet & exercise plan.
4. Monthly visits to a health care team which consists of a physician, nurse, dietician & behavioural therapist.

Risks involved with participating in an intensive management therapy? Low blood sugars. It was clear that less stringent goals are appropriate for some patients.

This trial has become the pioneer of studies that changed the management of Type 1 diabetes . Since completion of the study in 1993 there has been further work done to answer more questions & give more data. I will continue to post on these.